Calendar

Mar
14
Thu
Rutgers Philosophy Dept. Colloquia @ Seminar Room, Gateway Transit Building, 5th flr
Mar 14 @ 3:00 pm

The Department’s colloquium series typically meets on Thursdays in the Seminar Room at Gateway Transit Building, 106 Somerset Street, 5th Floor at 3:00 p.m. Please see the Department Calendar for scheduled speakers and more details.

  • 01/31  Department Colloquium-Prof. Brian Epstein (Tufts)
  • 02/07  Inclusive Pedagogy by Prof. Zoë Johnson-King (NYU)
  • 02/28  Climate Lecture-Prof. Teresa Blankmeyer Burke (Gallaudet University)
  • 03/14  Mesthene Lecture-Prof. Lara Buchak (UC Berkeley)
  • 03/28  Break It Down Lecture-Prof. Paul Pietroski, “Human Languages: What are They?”
  • 04/11  Class of 1970s Lecture: Prof. Gideon Rosen (Princeton) Alexander Teleconf. Lecture Hall, 4:30-7:30 pm
  • 04/18  Break It Down Lecture-Prof. Larry Temkin, “Population Ethics: Forty Years On”
  • 04/25 – 04/27 Semantics Workshop (Lepore)
  • 04/27  Rutgers Day 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
  • 05/03  Epistemology Conference
  • 05/04  Epistemology Conference
  • 07/21 – 07/26 Summer Institute for Diversity in Philosophy
Susanna Schellenberg (Rutgers) Capacities First @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 5307
Mar 14 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Despite their importance in the history of philosophy and in particular in the work of Aristotle and Kant, mental capacities have been neglected in recent philosophical work. By contrast, the notion of a capacity is deeply entrenched in psychology and the brain sciences. Driven by the idea that a cognitive system has the capacity it does in virtue of its internal components and their organization, it is standard to appeal to capacities in cognitive psychology. The main benefit of invoking capacities in an account of the mind is that it allows for an elegant counterfactual analysis of mental states: it allows us to analyze mental states on three distinct yet interrelated levels. A first level of analysis pertains to the function of mental capacities. A second level of analysis pertains to the mental capacities employed, irrespective of the context in which they are employed. A third level of analysis pertains to the mental capacities employed, taking into account the context in which they are employed. I show how an account on which perception is constitutively a matter of employing discriminatory capacities allows for a unified account of perceptual content, perceptual consciousness, and perceptual evidence.

Working Papers in Ethics and Moral Psychology @ Icahn School @Mount Sinai, Annenberg 12-16
Mar 14 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

Working Papers in Ethics and Moral Psychology is a speaker series conducted under the auspices of the Icahn School of Medicine Bioethics Program. It is a working group where speakers are invited to present well-developed, as yet unpublished work. The focus of the group is interdisciplinary, with an emphasis on topics in ethics, bioethics, neuroethics, and moral psychology. The meetings begin with a brief presentation by the invited speaker and the remaining time is devoted to a discussion of the paper. The speakers will make their papers available in advance of their presentation to those who sign up for the Working Papers mailing list.

Upcoming Speakers:

11 Oct: Jordan Mackenzie, NYU

8 Nov: Susana Nuccetelli, St. Cloud State

13 Dec: Michael Brownstein, John Jay

14 Mar: Kyle Ferguson, CUNY

18 Apr: Jeff Sebo, NYU

23 May: Johann Frick, Princeton

Andrea Long Chu “Females: A Concern “ @ Wolff Conference Room, D1103
Mar 14 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

“Everyone is female”—this is the first of several “untenable claims” presented by Andrea Long Chu in her forthcoming book Females: A Concern (Verso, 2019). Drawing inspiration from Valerie Solanas’s SCUM Manifesto and her forgotten play Up Your Ass, this lecture in numbered theses whips through a variety of ugly objects (films, manifestos, performance art, psychoanalysis, porn, and the alt-right) to give a portrait of femaleness as a universal category of self-ablation against which all politics—even feminist politics—revolts.

Andrea Long Chu is a writer and critic completing her doctorate at New York University. Her writing has appeared, or will soon, in n+1Boston ReviewThe New York TimesNew YorkArtforumBookforumChronicle of Higher Education4ColumnsdifferencesWomen & PerformanceTSQ, and Journal of Speculative Philosophy. Her book Females: A Concern is forthcoming this year from Verso.

People in Support of Women in Philosophy is a group dedicated to the advancement of women and those who experience marginalization within the field of philosophy. Our group meets weekly to workshop papers, help members prepare for conference presentations and seminars, host guest speakers, and in general celebrate the work of our women and gender-non-conforming colleagues and mentors. Men are welcome and encouraged to take part as allies.

NYC Minorities and Philosophy Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, rm tba
Mar 14 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

The Minorities and Philosophy (MAP) chapters of Columbia, NYU, Rutgers, and the Graduate Center, CUNY, invite submissions to the Spring 2019 NY-MAPWorks: a workshop series featuring the work of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows on topics in critical social philosophy and non-canonical areas of philosophy.

Topics include, but are not limited to: social philosophy (including intersections with epistemology, language, and metaphysics), feminist philosophy and philosophy of sex and gender, philosophy of race, queer philosophy, non-western philosophy, africana philosophy, latinx philosophy, native american philosophy, and women in the history of philosophy.

The Format

The series will alternate locations in New York City (see below for the full list of dates and locations). Each workshop will be two and a half hours long and consist of two talks. Each presenter will have a 50-minute session consisting of a 25-30 minute talk and a 20-25 minute Q&A. The workshop will conclude with a catered reception.

Dates and Locations*

February 20, 6-8 p.m. (NYU)

March 14, 6-8 p.m. (CUNY GC)

April (Columbia) — Date TBA

*Exact building/room locations will be updated.

For more on MAP, please seehttp://www.mapforthegap.com/about.html.

Philosophy of Psychology Workshop @ 302 Philosophy Hall, Columbia U
Mar 14 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

PoPRocks (formerly known as ‘WoPoP’) is an ongoing series in the NYC area for early career researchers – typically grad students, postdocs, people who got their PhD within the last few years, advanced undergrads etc. – working on philosophy of psychology/mind/perception/cognitive science/neuroscience/… . We usually meet roughly once every 2-3 weeks to informally discuss a draft paper by one of our members. Typically presenters send a copy of their paper around 1 week in advance, so do join the mailing list (by emailing poprocksworkshop@gmail.com or one of the organizers) or email to ask for a copy of the paper. We aim for a friendly, constructive discussion with the understanding that the drafts discussed are typically work in progress.

Presenters Spring 2019

All presentations will be on Thursdays at 7-9pm in 302 Philosophy Hall, Columbia University (Morningside Heights Campus).

February 28th – Kate Pendoley (CUNY)

​March 14th – Amogh Sahu (Columbia)

April 18th – Nemira Gasiunas (Columbia)

If anyone else would like to present on other Thursdays, get in touch.

Perceptual Objectivity and Rational Agency -Amogh Sahu. Philosophy of Psychology Workshop @ 302 Philosophy Hall, Columbia U
Mar 14 @ 8:00 pm

PoPRocks (formerly known as ‘WoPoP’) is an ongoing series in the NYC area for early career researchers – typically grad students, postdocs, people who got their PhD within the last few years, advanced undergrads etc. – working on philosophy of psychology/mind/perception/cognitive science/neuroscience/… . We usually meet roughly once every 2-3 weeks to informally discuss a draft paper by one of our members. Typically presenters send a copy of their paper around 1 week in advance, so do join the mailing list (by emailing poprocksworkshop@gmail.com or one of the organizers) or email to ask for a copy of the paper. We aim for a friendly, constructive discussion with the understanding that the drafts discussed are typically work in progress.

Presenters Spring 2019

All presentations will be on Thursdays at 7-9pm in 302 Philosophy Hall, Columbia University (Morningside Heights Campus).

February 28th – Kate Pendoley (CUNY)

​March 14th – Amogh Sahu (Columbia)

April 18th – Nemira Gasiunas (Columbia)

If anyone else would like to present on other Thursdays, get in touch.

Mar
15
Fri
Black Women Philosophers Conference @ Elebash Recital Hall, CUNY Grad Center
Mar 15 – Mar 16 all-day

What does a philosopher look like? Inevitably, our mental pictures are shaped by the dominant imagery of the white male marble busts of Greco-Roman antiquity—Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Seneca—and their modern European heirs—Hobbes, Descartes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Mill. Even today Western philosophy is largely male and overwhelmingly white—about 97 percent in the U.S., close to 100 percent in Europe. Diversifying the field requires expanding our corporeal imaginary of its practitioners. This conference, timed to honor Professor Anita Allen-Castellitto (Penn), the first black female President in the 100-year-plus history of the American Philosophical Association, aims to showcase the work of a traditionally under-represented population, challenging these preconceptions. Allen and fifteen other black women will speak on their research across a wide variety of philosophical topics.

ORGANIZED BY:
Charles W. Mills & Linda Martín Alcoff

LIST OF SPEAKERS

Anita Allen-Castellitto, University of Pennsylvania
Kathryn Belle, Penn State University
Emmalon Davis, New School for Social Research
Nathifa Greene, Gettysburg College
Devonya Havis, Canisius College
Janine Jones, University of North Carolina Greensboro
Axelle Karera, Wesleyan University
Michele Moody-Adams, Columbia University
Mickaella Perina, University of Massachusetts Boston
Camisha Russell, University of Oregon
Jackie Scott, Loyola University Chicago
Kris Sealey, Fairfield University
Jameliah Shorter-Bourhanou, Georgia College, College of the Holy Cross
Anika Simpson, Morgan State University
Briana Toole, CUNY Baruch College
Yolonda Wilson, Howard University

Stay tuned for schedule details!

Hosted by: The Center for the Humanities and the PhD Program in Philosophy at the The Graduate Center, CUNY.

Co-sponsored by: The American Philosophical Association Committee on the Status of Black Philosophers, and the Advanced Research Collaborative at the Graduate Center, CUNY.

——————————————
Free and open to the public, but please register for Friday, March 15th here:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/black-women-philosophers-conference-day-1-march-15th-2019-registration-56225763773

Please register for Saturday, March 16th here:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/black-women-philosophers-conference-day-2-march-16th-2019-registration-56225886139

The venue is wheel-chair accessible.

To download a PDF version of the flyer, click here.

Brown Bag Series @ Philosophy Conference Room, Collins Hall, Room 139
Mar 15 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

A presentation of ongoing research by Fordham Philosophers; bring your own lunch, light refreshments will be provided. All meetings are from 12:00-1:00 pm in the Philosophy Department Conference Room in Collins Hall.

Contact: Stephen Grimm

Stephen Grimm – September 14, 2018
Andrew Jampol-Petzinger – October 26, 2018
Lauren Kopajtic – November 16, 2018
Nicholas Smyth – February 15, 2019
Brian Johnson – March 15, 2019
Crina Gschwandtner – April 5, 2019

Sue Weinberg Lecture in honor of the life and work of Eileen O’Neill @ CUNY Grad Center, rm tba
Mar 15 @ 12:00 pm

Save the date!
March 15, 2019
Sue Weinberg Lecture in honor of the life and work of Eileen O’Neill.
CUNY Graduate Center, room TBD