Calendar

May
16
Thu
Conference in Honor of Jerry Fodor @ Academic Building, Room 1180, Rutgers
May 16 – May 17 all-day

Thursday, May 16th

9:00-9:30 am Breakfast (Provided)
9:30-9:45 am Opening Remarks, James Swenson, Vice Provost for Academic Affairs
9:45-10:45 am Session 1 – Tom Bever, “Foundational cognitive science themes that Jerry explored”
10:45-11:00 am Coffee Break
11:00 am – Noon Session 2 – Rochel Gelman, “Innate learning and beyond: The case of number”
Noon – 2:30 pm Lunch (Not provided, see below for options)
2:30-3:30 pm Session 3 – Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini“What Jerry and I got right about what Darwin got wrong”
3:30-3:45 pm Coffee Break
3:45-4:45 pm Session 4 – David Rosenthal“Fodor’s Representationalism”
4:45-5:45 pm Session 5 – Terry Horgan“Morphological content and chromatic illumination in belief fixation”
6:00 pm Dinner Reception Open to All (6th Floor WEST Wing of the Academic Building)

 

Friday, May 17th

9:00-9:15 am Breakfast (Provided)
9:15-10:15 am Session 6 – Louise Antony, “Not psychological, but not brutely causal either”
10:15-10:30 am Coffee Break
10:30-11:30 am Session 7 – Kevan Edwards“Fodor* on concepts, Frege’s Problem, and the division of explanatory labor”
11:30 am – 12:30 pm Session 8 – Eric Margolis, “Understanding concept nativism”
12:30-3:00 pm Lunch (Not provided, see below for options)
3:00-4:00 pm Session 9 – Susan Schneider, “Conscious machines? A sober-minded approach”
4:00-4:15 pm Coffee Break
4:15-5:15 pm Session 10 – Georges Rey, “Fodor’s mis-guided Quineanism”
5:15-6:15 pm Session 11 – Randy Gallistel“It’s numbers all the way down”
6:15-6:30 pm Closing Remarks

 

Space is limited, so if you plan to attend, please click here to RSVP.

Ethical egoism (Introduction to Ethics series) @ Justine's apartment
May 16 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Philosophy-in-Manhattan
Thursday, May 16 at 6:30 PM

Justine Borer, adjunct philosophy professor at John Jay College, will lead this meeting. We’ll examine the theory of ethical egoism (the idea that peo…

Price: 18.00 USD

Ethical egoism (Introduction to Ethics series)

Thursday, May 16, 2019, 6:30 PM

Justine’s apartment
47 East 88th Street New York, NY

1 Members Attending

CUNY adjunct philosophy professor Justine Borer will lead this meeting. We’ll examine the theory of ethical egoism (the idea that people should always act in their own self-interest). The reading is Chapter 5 of “The Elements of Moral Philosophy,” by Rachels (available to buy, or to rent for approximately $20, on Amazon).

Check out this Meetup →

May
17
Fri
Nietzsche Circle Fundraiser @ Beyhan Karahan & Associates Architects
May 17 @ 7:00 pm

Annual Nietzsche Circle Fundraiser with talk, music, drinks, and refreshments.

$25 General Admission

$10 Student Admission

Levels of Sponsorship:

Eagle: Above $600 (5 free tickets and 4 books)

Hawk: $600 (4 free tickets and 3 books)

Falcon: $400 (3 free tickets and 2 books)

Owl: $200 (2 free tickets and 1 book)

Donations can be made direct, at our website at www.nietzschecirclecom/support_us.html, or simply bring a check with you. Payable to: Nietzsche Circle. Funds may be held in an escrow account subject to determination of 501(c) compliance. We thank you.

Please RSVP with Luke Trusso at luke.trusso@gmail.com by May 10, 2019 and include any guests.

May
20
Mon
2019 Association for Symbolic Logic North American Annual Meeting @ CUNY Grad Center
May 20 – May 23 all-day

Program Committee: Sam Buss, Johanna Franklin, Wesley Holliday (chair), Elaine Landry,Andrew Marks, and Joel Nagloo.Local Organizing Committee: Evangelia Antonakos (co-chair), Sergei Artemov, AlfredDolich, Shoshana Friedman (co-chair), Gunter Fuchs, and Joel Hamkins.

Please see

https://asl2019.commons.gc.cuny.edu

http://aslonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Schedule19AnnMtg.pdf

for additional information. All plenary and tutorial lectures will be held in Proshansky Auditorium, on the lower levelof the Graduate Center. All special session and contributed talks will be in the nearbyrooms C197, C198, and C201–C205. The welcoming reception will be held at 6:00 pm onMonday, May 20 in the Concourse Lobby, in front of Proshansky Auditorium.

The Perception of Time in Intuitionistic Arithmetic (Vincent Peluce) Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, 7314
May 20 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm

In L.E.J. Brouwer’s first act of intuitionism, the subject’s perception of time is put forth as the foundation on which arithmetic will be built. According to Brouwer, proper intuitionistic arithmetic, as with the rest of intuitionistic mathematics, is not tied to any particular formal system. When we try to axiomatically approximate an intuitionistic arithmetical system, we are faced with the problem of incorporating the subject and their perception into the axiom system itself. We discuss some unsatisfactory responses to this problem and then offer a solution.

The Logic and Metaphysics Workshop will be meeting on Mondays from 4:15 to 6:15 in room 7314 of the Graduate Center, CUNY (365 5th Avenue). The (provisional) schedule is as follows:

Feb 4. Melvin Fitting, CUNY

Feb 11. Benjamin Neeser, Geneva

Feb 18. GC CLOSED. NO MEETING

Feb 25. Achille Varzi, Columbia

Mar 4. Eric Bayruns Garcia, CUNY

Mar 11. Jeremy Goodman, USC

Mar 18. Romina Padro, CUNY

Mar 25. Kit Fine, NYU

Apr 1. Elena Ficara, Paderborn

Apr 8. Chris Scambler, NYU

Apr 15.  Jenn McDonald, CUNY

Apr 22. GC CLOSED. NO MEETING

Apr 29. Tommy Kivatinos, CUNY

May 6. Daniel Durante, Natal

May 13. Martina Botti, Columbia

May 20. Vincent Peluce, CUNY

May
23
Thu
Working Papers in Ethics and Moral Psychology @ Icahn School @Mount Sinai, Annenberg 12-16
May 23 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

Working Papers in Ethics and Moral Psychology is a speaker series conducted under the auspices of the Icahn School of Medicine Bioethics Program. It is a working group where speakers are invited to present well-developed, as yet unpublished work. The focus of the group is interdisciplinary, with an emphasis on topics in ethics, bioethics, neuroethics, and moral psychology. The meetings begin with a brief presentation by the invited speaker and the remaining time is devoted to a discussion of the paper. The speakers will make their papers available in advance of their presentation to those who sign up for the Working Papers mailing list.

Upcoming Speakers:

11 Oct: Jordan Mackenzie, NYU

8 Nov: Susana Nuccetelli, St. Cloud State

13 Dec: Michael Brownstein, John Jay

14 Mar: Kyle Ferguson, CUNY

18 Apr: Jeff Sebo, NYU

23 May: Johann Frick, Princeton

Social contract theory (Introduction to Ethics series) @ Justine's apartment
May 23 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Philosophy-in-Manhattan
Thursday, May 23 at 6:30 PM

Justine Borer, adjunct professor of philosophy at John Jay College, will lead this meeting. We’ll discuss social contract theory (the idea that morali…

Price: 18.00 USD

Social contract theory (Introduction to Ethics series)

Thursday, May 23, 2019, 6:30 PM

Justine’s apartment
47 East 88th Street New York, NY

1 Members Attending

Justine Borer, adjunct professor of philosophy at John Jay College, will lead this meeting. We’ll discuss social contract theory, including the famous Prisoner’s Dilemma. The reading is Chapter 6 in “The Elements of Moral Philosophy,” 8th edition, by Rachels (available to buy, or to rent for approximately $20, on Amazon).

Check out this Meetup →

May
30
Thu
Utilitarianism (Introduction to Ethics series) @ Justine's apartment
May 30 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Philosophy-in-Manhattan
Thursday, May 30 at 6:30 PM

Justine Borer, adjunct professor of philosophy at John Jay College, will lead this meeting. We’ll discuss utilitarianism (commonly known as “the great…

Price: 18.00 USD

Utilitarianism (Introduction to Ethics series)

Thursday, May 30, 2019, 6:30 PM

Justine’s apartment
47 East 88th Street New York, NY

1 Members Attending

Justine Borer, adjunct professor of philosophy at John Jay College, will lead this meeting. We’ll discuss utilitarianism (commonly known as “the greatest good for the greatest number”) The reading is Chapter 7 in “The Elements of Philosophy,” 8th edition, by Rachels (available to buy, or to rent for approximately $20, on Amazon).

Check out this Meetup →

May
31
Fri
Humane Understanding Conference @ Fordham Lincoln Center
May 31 – Jun 1 all-day

As work on the nature of understanding has expanded in recent years, there has been increasing interest in the question of what might be distinctive about our understanding of other people, or humane understanding.

Our conference will explore this question, and consider how recent debates might be enriched by insights from areas such as epistemology, the philosophy of science, the philosophy of social science, the hermeneutical tradition, and the “verstehen” tradition in Continental philosophy.

Confirmed Speakers:

Olivia Bailey (Tulane)

Kristin Gjesdal (Temple)

Stephen R. Grimm (Fordham)

Kareem Khalifa (Middlebury)

Michael Strevens (NYU)

Karsten Stueber (Holy Cross)

Call for Abstracts:

3-4 spots on the program will be filled via a call for abstracts. Submitted abstracts should be no longer than 500 words, and should be emailed to sgrimm@fordham.edu by December 1, 2018. Meals at the conference will be covered, but scholars whose abstracts are selected will cover their own travel and lodging costs. Abstracts should try to engage with the following questions:

How does understanding people differ from other kinds of understanding, such as the understanding of concepts, language, or natural phenomena? Do these various types of understanding bring different cognitive resources to bear, or have different epistemic profiles?

Is there a deep unity among these types of understanding, or not?

What are the distinctive ways in which the study of literature or art or history enhance our understanding of other people?

What role does the reenactment of another’s perspective play in humane understanding? Is it merely a heuristic for discovering a person’s mental states (as Hempel seemed to think) or does it play a more epistemically robust role? Is reenactment of this sort indispensable to intentional-action explanation?

How does recent research on social cognition and mindreading bear on older debates about Verstehen?

How does the hermeneutical tradition shed light on these issues? Is it engaged with different questions, or does it pursue them from a distinctively different angle?

How do we adjudicate between competing interpretations of people’s actions?

What contribution does memory make to humane understanding?

Jun
6
Thu
Are there absolute moral rules? (Introduction to Ethics series) @ Justine's apartment
Jun 6 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Philosophy-in-Manhattan
Thursday, June 6 at 6:30 PM

Justine Borer, adjunct professor of philosophy at John Jay College, will lead this meeting. Are there absolute moral rules? We’ll consider Kant’s view…

Price: 18.00 USD

Are there absolute moral rules? (Introduction to Ethics series)

Thursday, Jun 6, 2019, 6:30 PM

Justine’s apartment
47 East 88th Street New York, NY

2 Members Attending

Justine Borer, adjunct professor of philosophy at John Jay College, will lead this meeting. Are there absolute moral rules? We’ll consider Kant’s view and examine issues such as using an atomic bomb. The reading is Chapter 9 in “The Elements of Moral Philosophy,” 8th edition, by Rachels (available to buy, or to rent for approximately $20, on Amazon…

Check out this Meetup →