Calendar

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What does it mean that Contradiction is the Norm of Truth? Elena Ficara (Paderborn) Logic & Metaphysics Workshop 4:15 pm
What does it mean that Contradiction is the Norm of Truth? Elena Ficara (Paderborn) Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, 7314
Apr 1 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
In my talk I argue for the thesis CT: contradiction is the norm of truth, and ask about its relevance for contemporary philosophical logic. I first present three positions in the history of philosophy that have advocated some versions of CT, namely Plato’s idea of the “dialectical gymnastics” in the Parmenides (Plato, Parmenides 136 B-E), Aristotle’s notion of dialectics in the Topics (Aristotle, Topics I, 2-3) and Metaphysics (Aristotle, Met III 1, 995 a 24-29), and Hegel’s contradictio est regula veri (Hegel Werke 2, 533), then derive from them some answers to the questions: What is meant by “contradiction” in CT? What is meant by “truth” in CT? What is meant by “norm” in CT? I will show that to examine the …

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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Apr 3 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. Download an interactive PDF version of the schedule here. February 6 • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture Ned Block (New York University) “Perception is Non-Propositional, Non-Conceptual and Iconic” February 13 Francesco Pupa (Nassau Community College) “Determiners are Phrases” February 20 Robert Rupert (University of Colorado, Boulder) “There Is No Personal Level: On the Virtues of a Psychology Flattened from Above” February 27 Reed Winegar (Fordham University) “Kant on Infinity” March 6 • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture David Schweickart (Loyola …

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Intersubjectivity and Interpretation: CUNY Grad Conference 2019
Intersubjectivity and Interpretation: CUNY Grad Conference 2019 @ CUNY Grad Center, rm tba
Apr 5 all-day
In ethics, in epistemology, in philosophy of mind and even (Searlean protestations notwithstanding) in ontology interest has steadily been growing in the idea that intersubjectivity is a central concept for understanding various aspects of our world. Similarly, the concept of interpretation has come to attention in a new light as a key means by which the interactions between subjectivities is mediated. This line of research raises a number of philosophical questions: – What is intersubjectivity? Can it be given ‘a clear explanation’? In what relation does it stand to objectivity? In what relation does it stand to the first-person and second-person perspectives? – What is interpretation? What is it to …

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German Idealism Workshop 4:30 pm
German Idealism Workshop @ Columbia University, Philosophy rm 716
Apr 5 @ 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm
8 February @Columbia Patricia Kitcher: The Fact of Reason in Kant’s Moral Psychology Response: Jessica Tizzard 22 February @NSSR Matters of Love: A Conference 5 April @Columbia Beatrice Longuenesse: Residues of First Nature 19 April @NSSR Angelica Nuzzo: Approaching Hegel’s Logic Obliquely: Melville, Moliere, Beckett Response: David Carlson 10 May @Columbia Amy Allen: Turning Dead Ends into Through Streets: Psychoanalysis and the Idea of Progress
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Classical Logic and the Strict Tolerant Hierarchy (Chris Scambler) 4:15 pm
Classical Logic and the Strict Tolerant Hierarchy (Chris Scambler) @ CUNY Grad Center, 7314
Apr 8 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
In this talk I will do three things. First: I will present the central results from Barrio, Pailos and Szmuc’s recent paper “A hierarchy of classical and paraconsistent logics” (forthcoming in the JPL) along with some generalizations derived by observing certain symmetries; second, I will discuss the relation between the strict tolerant logics and classical logic, K3 and LP; third, I will try to convey the exact state of uncertainty about the philosophical significance of the foregoing I find myself in on the day. The Logic and Metaphysics Workshop will be meeting on Mondays from 4:15 to 6:15 in room 7314 of the Graduate Center, CUNY (365 5th Avenue). The …

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Logic & Metaphysics Workshop 4:15 pm
Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, 7314
Apr 8 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
The Logic and Metaphysics Workshop will be meeting on Mondays from 4:15 to 6:15 in room 7314 of the Graduate Center, CUNY (365 5th Avenue). The (provisional) schedule is as follows: Feb 4. Melvin Fitting, CUNY Feb 11. Benjamin Neeser, Geneva Feb 18. GC CLOSED. NO MEETING Feb 25. Achille Varzi, Columbia Mar 4. Eric Bayruns Garcia, CUNY Mar 11. Jeremy Goodman, USC Mar 18. Romina Padro, CUNY Mar 25. Kit Fine, NYU Apr 1. Elena Ficara, Paderborn Apr 8. Chris Scambler, NYU Apr 15.  Jenn McDonald, CUNY Apr 22. GC CLOSED. NO MEETING Apr 29. Tommy Kivatinos, CUNY May 6. Daniel Durante, Natal May 13. Martina Botti, Columbia May 20. …

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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Apr 10 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. Download an interactive PDF version of the schedule here. February 6 • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture Ned Block (New York University) “Perception is Non-Propositional, Non-Conceptual and Iconic” February 13 Francesco Pupa (Nassau Community College) “Determiners are Phrases” February 20 Robert Rupert (University of Colorado, Boulder) “There Is No Personal Level: On the Virtues of a Psychology Flattened from Above” February 27 Reed Winegar (Fordham University) “Kant on Infinity” March 6 • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture David Schweickart (Loyola …

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Cognitive Science Speaker Series 1:00 pm
Cognitive Science Speaker Series @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 7102
Apr 12 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Spring 2019 2/15: Andrew Lee, Philosophy, New York University 2/22: William Robinson, Philosophy, Iowa State University 3/1: Wesley Sauret, Philosophy, University of Bayreuth 3/8: Jean-Paul Noel, Center for Neural Science, New York University 3/15: Santiago Echeverri, Philosophy, New York University 3/22: TBA 3/29: TBA 4/5: No Cognitive Science talk: CUNY Graduate-Student Conference https://2019cunyphilosophyconference.weebly.com/ 4/12: TBA 4/19, 4/26: No talks; Spring Break 5/3: TBA Additional information at: http://bit.ly/cscitalks or e-mail David Rosenthal <davidrosenthal1@gmail.com>
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Structural Counterfactuals and the Importation Problem (Jenn McDonald). Logic & Metaphysics Workshop 4:15 pm
Structural Counterfactuals and the Importation Problem (Jenn McDonald). Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, 7314
Apr 15 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
Structural causal models lend themselves to an analysis of counterfactuals – a structural semantics of counterfactuals. The basic idea is that a causal model allows for the clear and precise evaluation of any counterfactual encoded by it. Many argue that a structural semantics is superior to a more traditional similarity semantics, in part due to the latter’s independence from any notion of similarity(Galles & Pearl, 1998; Gallow, 2016; Hiddleston, 2005; Hitchcock, 2018; Pearl, 2000; Starr, 2019). I argue, though, that this is too quick. A similarity semantics employs the notion of similarity to answer what Priest (2018) calls the importation problem– the question of what information is to be held …

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Promises and Perils of Neuroprediction 4:00 pm
Promises and Perils of Neuroprediction @ Faculty House, Columbia U
Apr 16 @ 4:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Neuroprediction, the use of neuroscientific data to predict human behavior, can sound like science fiction. But with the advent of neuroimaging and the continuing rapid development of other non-invasive brain measurements, neuroprediction is increasingly a real-world phenomenon. Deep philosophical, legal, and neuroscientific questions arise regarding the use of these methods to predict behavior. Like all scientific tools, whether or not these technologies are used responsibly depends on who uses them. For instance, recent research illustrates the potential use of neuroprediction to assess an individual’s risk of (re-)engaging in antisocial conduct in forensic contexts. While the use of brain-based data may add predictive value to existing risk assessment tools, at the …

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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Apr 17 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. Download an interactive PDF version of the schedule here. February 6 • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture Ned Block (New York University) “Perception is Non-Propositional, Non-Conceptual and Iconic” February 13 Francesco Pupa (Nassau Community College) “Determiners are Phrases” February 20 Robert Rupert (University of Colorado, Boulder) “There Is No Personal Level: On the Virtues of a Psychology Flattened from Above” February 27 Reed Winegar (Fordham University) “Kant on Infinity” March 6 • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture David Schweickart (Loyola …

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Michela Massimi: Exploratory models, laws and modality 2:30 pm
Michela Massimi: Exploratory models, laws and modality @ CUNY Grad Center, 5307
Apr 18 @ 2:30 pm – 4:30 pm
I analyse the exploratory function of two main modelling practices: targetless fictional models and hypothetical perspectival models. In both cases, I argue, modelers invite us to imagine or conceive something about the target system, which is either known to be non-existent (fictional models) or just hypothetical (in perspectival models). I clarify the kind of imagining or conceiving involved in each modelling practice, and I show how each—in its own right—delivers important modal knowledge. I illustrate these two kinds of exploratory models with Maxwell’s ether model and SUSY models at the LHC. There may be a coffee/snack time after the talk, depending on how tired our speaker is from having traveled …

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Jennifer Marusic (Brandeis) 4:10 pm
Jennifer Marusic (Brandeis) @ Columbia University, Philosophy rm 716
Apr 18 @ 4:10 pm – 6:00 pm
Title: TBA Reception to follow
Nemira Gasiunas – Philosophy of Psychology Workshop 7:00 pm
Nemira Gasiunas – Philosophy of Psychology Workshop @ 302 Philosophy Hall, Columbia U
Apr 18 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
PoPRocks (formerly known as ‘WoPoP’) is an ongoing series in the NYC area for early career researchers – typically grad students, postdocs, people who got their PhD within the last few years, advanced undergrads etc. – working on philosophy of psychology/mind/perception/cognitive science/neuroscience/… . We usually meet roughly once every 2-3 weeks to informally discuss a draft paper by one of our members. Typically presenters send a copy of their paper around 1 week in advance, so do join the mailing list (by emailing poprocksworkshop@gmail.com or one of the organizers) or email to ask for a copy of the paper. We aim for a friendly, constructive discussion with the understanding that …

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German Idealism Workshop 4:30 pm
German Idealism Workshop @ Columbia University, Philosophy rm 716
Apr 19 @ 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm
8 February @Columbia Patricia Kitcher: The Fact of Reason in Kant’s Moral Psychology Response: Jessica Tizzard 22 February @NSSR Matters of Love: A Conference 5 April @Columbia Beatrice Longuenesse: Residues of First Nature 19 April @NSSR Angelica Nuzzo: Approaching Hegel’s Logic Obliquely: Melville, Moliere, Beckett Response: David Carlson 10 May @Columbia Amy Allen: Turning Dead Ends into Through Streets: Psychoanalysis and the Idea of Progress
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Huttegger: Rethinking Convergence to the Truth. Simon Huttegger (UC Irvine) 4:10 pm
Huttegger: Rethinking Convergence to the Truth. Simon Huttegger (UC Irvine) @ Faculty House, Columbia U
Apr 26 @ 4:10 pm
Convergence to the truth is viewed with some ambivalence in philosophy of science. On the one hand, methods of inquiry that lead to the truth in the limit are prized as marks of scientific rationality. But an agent who, by using some method, expects to always converge to the truth seems to fail a minimum standard of epistemic modesty. This point was recently brought home by Gordon Belot in his critique of Bayesian epistemology. In this paper I will study convergence to the truth theorems within the framework of Edward Nelson’s radically elementary probability theory. This theory provides an enriched conceptual framework for investigating convergence and gives rise to an …

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So You Want to Diversify Philosophy: Some Thoughts on Structural Change. Leah Kalmanson (Drake) 6:00 pm
So You Want to Diversify Philosophy: Some Thoughts on Structural Change. Leah Kalmanson (Drake) @ Columbia University Religion Dept. 101
Apr 26 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Efforts to diversify philosophy, at the curricular level, often focus on increasing the content covered in a semester: i.e., making room for more women on the syllabus, making room for more non-Western texts and thinkers, etc. Similarly, efforts to diversify philosophy, at the professional level, often focus on making room for marginalized topics and/or members of under-represented groups at conferences, in anthologies, and among faculty (both in terms of demographics and research specializations). This all serves to create an antagonistic situation where marginalized voices must fight to be heard and those in the discipline must make “tough choices” about where to cede precious resources such as syllabus space, publication credits, …

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Mapping the Moral Realm: The Philosophy of Stefan Bernard Baumrin 1:30 pm
Mapping the Moral Realm: The Philosophy of Stefan Bernard Baumrin @ CUNY Grad Center, C197
Apr 29 @ 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm
STEFAN BERNARD BAUMRIN was a husband, father, philosopher, lawyer, colleague, teacher, and friend. As a professional philosopher, Baumrin wrote sparingly, but incisively, on moral and political philosophy, medical ethics, the history of philosophy, and on matters of both theoretical and practical import. We, his students, colleagues, and most importantly friends, celebrate his memory with this symposium on his philosophy. THE PROGRAM Welcome Professors David Rosenthal and Manfred Philipp Session I I. “Baumrin’s Hobbes”: Rosamond Rhodes II. “A possibility for Moore’s Faulty Fallacy” Mark Sheehan Discussion Break (Light Refreshments) Session II I.“Baumrin on Autonomy” Katherine Mendis II. “‘Physician, Stay Thy Hand!’ Revisited” Kyle Ferguson III. “Our Immorality” Joseph S. Biehl Discussion Farewell PARTICIPANTS …

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Logic & Metaphysics Workshop 4:15 pm
Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, 7314
Apr 29 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
The Logic and Metaphysics Workshop will be meeting on Mondays from 4:15 to 6:15 in room 7314 of the Graduate Center, CUNY (365 5th Avenue). The (provisional) schedule is as follows: Feb 4. Melvin Fitting, CUNY Feb 11. Benjamin Neeser, Geneva Feb 18. GC CLOSED. NO MEETING Feb 25. Achille Varzi, Columbia Mar 4. Eric Bayruns Garcia, CUNY Mar 11. Jeremy Goodman, USC Mar 18. Romina Padro, CUNY Mar 25. Kit Fine, NYU Apr 1. Elena Ficara, Paderborn Apr 8. Chris Scambler, NYU Apr 15.  Jenn McDonald, CUNY Apr 22. GC CLOSED. NO MEETING Apr 29. Tommy Kivatinos, CUNY May 6. Daniel Durante, Natal May 13. Martina Botti, Columbia May 20. …

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