Calendar

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Recent Work in Decision Theory and Epistemology Workshop
Recent Work in Decision Theory and Epistemology Workshop @ Philosophy Hall rm 716
Mar 3 all-day
Speakers: Jennifer Carr (University of California, San Diego) Ryan Doody (Hebrew University of Jerusalem) Harvey Lederman (Princeton University) Chris Meacham (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) Organizer: Melissa Fusco (Columbia University) 9:30 – 10:00 Breakfast (716 Philosophy Hall) SESSION I Chair: Melissa Fusco 10:00 – 11:30 Jennifer Carr: “Can Accuracy Motivate Modesty?” 11:30 – 11:45 Coffee Break I SESSION II Chair: Jessica John Collins 11:45 – 1:15 Ryan Doody: “Hard Choices Made Harder” 1:15 – 2:30 Lunch SESSION III Chair: Jennifer Carr 2:30 – 4:00 Harvey Lederman: “Verbalism” 4:00 – 4:30 Coffee Break II SESSION IV Chair: Ryan Doody 4:30 – 6:00 Chris Meacham: “Decision in Cases of Infinitely Many Utility Contributions” …

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Evidence and Theory in Neuroscience – Seminars in Society and Neuroscience 4:15 pm
Evidence and Theory in Neuroscience – Seminars in Society and Neuroscience @ Faculty House, Columbia U
Mar 5 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
What constitutes evidence is rarely self-evident. We need theories to make sense of evidence—to transform patterns of physical occurrences into something meaningful, i.e., data. This relationship between theory and evidence is often at least partially opaque, particularly in a field like neuroscience that often aims to use physical evidence to characterize mental, and in some cases social, events. Neuroscience navigates this relationship by purporting to offer mechanistic descriptions of “how” mental processes operate. Yet, this inquiry relies on theoretical assumptions that are not fully tethered to data. Neuroscience can certainly generate predictions from theories that have practical implications and link them with mechanistic knowledge of the physical (e.g., anatomy and …

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Hindus Against God: Anti-theistic Arguments in Sāṃkhya and Vedānta Philosophy – Andrew Nicholson (SUNY Stony Brook) 4:15 pm
Hindus Against God: Anti-theistic Arguments in Sāṃkhya and Vedānta Philosophy – Andrew Nicholson (SUNY Stony Brook) @ Knox Hall, Room 208
Mar 5 @ 4:15 pm – 5:45 pm
Moderated by Sheldon Pollock, Arvind Raghunathan Professor of South Asian Studies, MESAAS Andrew J. Nicholson is Associate Professor at State University of New York at Stony Brook. He earned his PhD in South Asian Languages and Civilizations at Chicago.  Nicholson’s primary area of research is Indian philosophy and intellectual history, most recently focusing on medieval Vedānta philosophy and its influence on ideas about Hinduism in modern Europe and India. His first book, Unifying Hinduism: Philosophy and Identity in Indian Intellectual History (2010) was part of the South Asia Across the Disciplines book series sponsored by the university presses at California, Chicago, and Columbia.  In 2011, it won the American Academy of …

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Minorities and Philosophy Spring Workshop Series 7:00 pm
Minorities and Philosophy Spring Workshop Series @ Various Locations around NYC
Mar 6 @ 7:00 pm – 9:30 pm
The Minorities and Philosophy (MAP) Chapters of Columbia, The New School, Rutgers, CUNY, NYU, and Princeton invite submissions from graduate students and postdoctoral fellows from underrepresented groups for a workshop series (NY-MAPWorks) in spring 2018. Dates: Jan 30th (NYU), Feb. 20th (New School), March 6th (CUNY), April 17th (Columbia), May 8th (NYU), 7-9:30pm. Submission Guidelines: To apply, please compete the following by December 15th, 2017: Send an extended abstract of 750-1,000 words (.pdf or .doc), prepared for blind review, suitable for a 25-30 minute presentation to a general philosophical audience to nymapshop@gmail.com. Provide your contact information by completing this google form. Applications will only be accepted from individuals from groups …

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Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy 5:30 pm
Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy @ Columbia Religion Dept. rm 101
Mar 9 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Feb. 9: Cat Prueitt (George Mason University) March 9: Kin Cheung (Moravian College) April 13: Lara Braitstein (McGill University) May 11: David Cummiskey (Bates College) Also, please visit our website: http://www.cbs.columbia.edu/cscp/ Co-Chairs Professor Jonathan Gold Associate Professor, Princeton University, Department of Religion jcgold@princeton.edu Professor Hagop Sarkissian Associate Professor, The City University of New York, Baruch College | Graduate Center, Department of Philosophy hagop.sarkissian@baruch.cuny.edu Rapporteur Jay Ramesh jr3203@columbia.edu
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Consistency Conditions on Fundamental Physics – Rachel Rosen (Columbia University). 2:10 pm
Consistency Conditions on Fundamental Physics – Rachel Rosen (Columbia University). @ Columbia University Philosophy Dept.
Mar 20 @ 2:10 pm – 4:00 pm
as our understanding of the universe and its basic building blocks extends to shorter and shorter distances, experiments capable of probing these scales are becoming increasingly difficult to construct. Fundamental particle physics faces a potential crisis: an absence of data at the shortest possible scales. Yet remarkably, even in the absence of experimental data, the requirement of theoretical consistency puts stringent constraints on viable models of fundamental particles and their interactions. In this talk I’ll present some of these constraints and discuss their applications for cosmology, string theory and more. There will be dinner after the talk. If you are interested, please send an email with “Dinner” in the heading …

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Waiting, Watching, Acting: Immediate and Deferred Responses to Political Crisis
Waiting, Watching, Acting: Immediate and Deferred Responses to Political Crisis @ Columbia University Philosophy Dept. 702
Mar 23 all-day
Waiting, Watching, Acting: Immediate and Deferred Responses to Political Crisis Friday, March 23rd 702 Hamilton Hall Workshop Organizers: Lydia Goehr (Columbia) & Gregg Horowitz (Pratt Institute)
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Columbia-NYU Philosophy Grad Conference
Columbia-NYU Philosophy Grad Conference @ 310 Fayerweather Hall, Columbia U
Mar 24 all-day
The 18th Annual Columbia-NYU Graduate Conference in Philosophy The graduate students and faculty of the Columbia and NYU Philosophy Departments invite graduate submissions in any area of philosophy for a conference to be held on Saturday, March 24th, 2018 at Columbia University. Keynote Speaker: Richard Moran Brian D. Young Professor of Philosophy, Harvard University Submission Guidelines Submissions Deadline: Please make your submissions by following the instructions provided at ColumbiaNYU.wordpress.com by December 17th, 2017 (Notification by February 1st, 2018).  Papers must meet the following requirements: All papers must be between 3,000 and 5,000 words in length, suitable for a presentation of 30-40 minutes to a general philosophical audience. Submit papers with …

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Lying, Deception, Pretense, and Noncooperative Communication
Lying, Deception, Pretense, and Noncooperative Communication @ Columbia University 453 Mudd (Computer Science Department)
Mar 24 all-day
Workshop on Lying, Deception, Pretense, and Noncooperative Communication Saturday, March 24th 453 Mudd (Computer Science Department) Workshop Organizers: Una Stojnic (Columbia, Philosophy) & Julia Hirschberg (Columbia, Computer Science)
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Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy 5:30 pm
Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy @ Columbia Religion Dept. rm 101
Mar 30 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
The Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy (CSCP) is a University Seminar dedicated to the advancement of projects that draw on both western and non-western philosophy. The CSCP meets monthly on the campus of Columbia University and occasionally hosts conferences. Please save the following dates for our upcoming talks: March 30: Kin Cheung (Moravian College) April 13: Lara Braitstein (McGill University) May 11: David Cummiskey (Bates College)
Buddhist Theories of Truth, Truth-Telling, and Lies – Kin Cheung (Moravian College) 6:30 pm
Buddhist Theories of Truth, Truth-Telling, and Lies – Kin Cheung (Moravian College) @ Columbia Religion Dept. rm 101
Mar 30 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Contrary to Damien Keown (2001), who worries that metaphysical and epistemological inquiry may distract from ethical investigation, Bronwyn Finnigan and Koji Tanaka (2008) argue such questions may provide grounding for practical application of a Buddhist ethical path. I follow this line of inquiry into Buddhist theories of truth in order to better understand right speech as conceived in the Early Buddhist Suttas. I focus on what the Abhaya Sutta explicitly instructs and what it leaves out regarding the types of words the Tathagata does not say or has a sense of the proper time for saying them. K. N. Jayatilleke (1963) and Mark Siderits (1979) provide convincing evidence that contrary to popular …

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