Calendar

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Liberalism & Democracy Past, Present, Prospects @ John L. Tishman Auditorium, New School
Liberalism & Democracy Past, Present, Prospects @ John L. Tishman Auditorium, New School
Feb 7 all-day
Liberal democratic values seem embattled as never before in the United States, and around the world. The time is right for a serious and wide-ranging exploration of the prospects for liberal democracies in a context that acknowledges the historical and contemporary tensions between democracy and liberal values, both in theory and in practice. This conference convenes a varied group of scholars, journalists, policy expert and veteran public servants, we hope to stage a real meeting of the minds, not the usual partisan sniping that occurs at most academic events – and we are trying to be as inclusive as possible, by inviting thoughtful representatives from the left, right, and center. …

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Liberalism & Democracy Past, Present, Prospects @ John L. Tishman Auditorium, New School
Liberalism & Democracy Past, Present, Prospects @ John L. Tishman Auditorium, New School
Feb 8 all-day
Liberal democratic values seem embattled as never before in the United States, and around the world. The time is right for a serious and wide-ranging exploration of the prospects for liberal democracies in a context that acknowledges the historical and contemporary tensions between democracy and liberal values, both in theory and in practice. This conference convenes a varied group of scholars, journalists, policy expert and veteran public servants, we hope to stage a real meeting of the minds, not the usual partisan sniping that occurs at most academic events – and we are trying to be as inclusive as possible, by inviting thoughtful representatives from the left, right, and center. …

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12:00 am Night of Philosophy and Ideas @ Brooklyn Public Library
Night of Philosophy and Ideas @ Brooklyn Public Library
Feb 3 @ 12:00 am – 7:00 am
A NIGHT OF PHILOSOPHY AND IDEAS is an all-night marathon of philosophical debate, performances, screenings, readings, and music. Join us and be a part of this FREE 12-HOUR EXCHANGE OF IDEAS, featuring top philosophers from around the world. FROM SATURDAY February 2 AT 7PM TO SUNDAY February 3, 2019 AT 7AM at Central Library, 10 Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn, NY Co-presented by Brooklyn Public Library and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy. Check back for more details in the coming weeks. The full schedule will appear here on January 10.
4:00 pm Feminism for the 99% and the New Feminist Wave @ Wolff Conference Room, D1103
Feminism for the 99% and the New Feminist Wave @ Wolff Conference Room, D1103
Feb 4 @ 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm
In preparation for the next transnational feminist strike on March 8th, we will have a discussion about the new feminist wave with some of its protagonists and organizers from around the world and a conversation around Arruzza, Bhattacharya, Fraser, “Feminism for the 99%. A Manifesto” (Verso 2019). Program: 4:00 p.m.:  Welcome and Opening Remarks: William Milberg (Director of the Heilbroner Center for Capitalist Studies) and Cinzia Arruzza (NSSR) 4:15–6:00 p.m.: The New Feminist Wave Speakers: Ximena Bustamante (IWS) Julia Cámara (National Coordination 8M, Spain) Luci Cavallero (Ni Una Menos, Argentina) Mayra Cotta De Souza (NSSR) Chair: Meg Beyer (IWS and NSSR) 6:00–6:15 p.m.: Break 6:15–8:00 p.m.: Feminism for the 99%. …

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4:15 pm Bilattices and Strict Tolerant Logics (Melvin Fitting) @ CUNY Grad Center, 7314
Bilattices and Strict Tolerant Logics (Melvin Fitting) @ CUNY Grad Center, 7314
Feb 4 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
Strict/tolerant logic is a formally defined logic that has the same consequence relation as classical logic, though it differs from classical logic at the metaconsequence level. Specifically, it does not satisfy a cut rule. It has been recommended for use in work on theories of truth because it avoids some objectionable features arising from the use of classical logic. Here we are not interested in applications, but in the formal details themselves. We show that a wide range of logics have strict/tolerant counterparts, with the same consequence relations but differing at the metaconsequence level. Among these logics are Kleene’s K3, Priest’s LP, and first degree entailment, FDE. The primary tool …

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6:30 pm Philosophy of Language Workshop @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 302
Philosophy of Language Workshop @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 302
Feb 4 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
We’re a community of philosophers of language centered in New York City. We have a meeting each week at which a speaker presents a piece of their own work relating to the philosophy of language. 28 January Luca Incurvati (ILLC/Amsterdam) 4 February Dan Hoek (NYU) 11 February Peter Klecha (Swarthmore) 25 February Ginger Schultheis (NYU/Chicago) and David Boylan (Rutgers) 4 March Chris Tancredi (Keio University, Tokyo) 11 March TBD 25 March Yael Sharvit (UCLA) 1 April Thony Gillies (Rutgers) 8 April Yale Weiss (CUNY) 15 April Friederike Moltmann (CNRS) 22 April Amir Anvari (Institut Jean Nicod, ENS) 29 April David Balcarras (MIT) 6 May Nadine Theiler (ILLC, Amsterdam) 13 May …

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4:30 pm RESCHEDULED: The variety of scientism and the limits of science, Massimo Pigliucci (CUNY) @ CUNY Grad Center, 5307
RESCHEDULED: The variety of scientism and the limits of science, Massimo Pigliucci (CUNY) @ CUNY Grad Center, 5307
Feb 5 @ 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Massimo Pigliucci’s talk has been rescheduled, for personal reasons outside of his control. It will be rescheduled for a later date: here. Science is by far the most powerful approach to the investigation of the natural world ever devised. Still, it has limits, and there are many areas and questions where the scientific approach is ill suited, or at best provides only pertinent information rather than full answers. The denial of this modest attitude about science is called scientism, which declares science to be the only form of human knowledge and understanding, attempting to subsume everything else, including all the humanistic disciplines, into “science” very broadly (mis-)construed. In this talk, …

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4:00 pm Mind and Language Seminar @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Mind and Language Seminar @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Feb 6 @ 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our topic for Spring 2018 will be Formal Frameworks for Semantics and Pragmatics. We’ll be investigating a range of questions in semantics and/or pragmatics which involve or are relevant to the choice between different kinds of overall structure for theories in these areas. In most sessions, the members of the seminar will receive a week in advance, copies of recent work, or work in progress from a thinker at another university. After reading this work, students discuss it with one of the instructors on the day before the colloquium. Then at the Tuesday colloquium, the instructors give a summary review and raise criticisms or questions about the work. The author …

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4:15 pm CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Feb 6 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. Download an interactive PDF version of the schedule here. February 6 • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture Ned Block (New York University) “Perception is Non-Propositional, Non-Conceptual and Iconic” February 13 Francesco Pupa (Nassau Community College) “Determiners are Phrases” February 20 Robert Rupert (University of Colorado, Boulder) “There Is No Personal Level: On the Virtues of a Psychology Flattened from Above” February 27 Reed Winegar (Fordham University) “Kant on Infinity” March 6 • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture David Schweickart (Loyola …

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7:30 pm The Extended Self: Autonomy and Technology in the Age of Distributed Cognition, Ethan Hallerman (Stony Brook) @ Brooklyn Public Library
The Extended Self: Autonomy and Technology in the Age of Distributed Cognition, Ethan Hallerman (Stony Brook) @ Brooklyn Public Library
Feb 6 @ 7:30 pm
In Philosophy in the Library, philosophers from around the world tackle the big questions. In February, we hear from Ethan Hallerman. None of us today can avoid reflecting on the way our thoughts and habits relate to the tools we use, but interest in how technologies reshape us is both older and broader than contemporary concerns around privacy, distraction, addiction, and isolation. For the past hundred years, scholars have investigated the historical role of everyday technologies in making new forms of experience and senses of selfhood possible, from at least as early as the invention of writing. In recent years, philosophers have considered how our understanding of agency and mental …

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3:00 pm Rutgers Philosophy Dept. Colloquia @ Seminar Room, Gateway Transit Building, 5th flr
Rutgers Philosophy Dept. Colloquia @ Seminar Room, Gateway Transit Building, 5th flr
Feb 7 @ 3:00 pm
The Department’s colloquium series typically meets on Thursdays in the Seminar Room at Gateway Transit Building, 106 Somerset Street, 5th Floor at 3:00 p.m. Please see the Department Calendar for scheduled speakers and more details. 01/31  Department Colloquium-Prof. Brian Epstein (Tufts) 02/07  Inclusive Pedagogy by Prof. Zoë Johnson-King (NYU) 02/28  Climate Lecture-Prof. Teresa Blankmeyer Burke (Gallaudet University) 03/14  Mesthene Lecture-Prof. Lara Buchak (UC Berkeley) 03/28  Break It Down Lecture-Prof. Paul Pietroski, “Human Languages: What are They?” 04/11  Class of 1970s Lecture: Prof. Gideon Rosen (Princeton) Alexander Teleconf. Lecture Hall, 4:30-7:30 pm 04/18  Break It Down Lecture-Prof. Larry Temkin, “Population Ethics: Forty Years On” 04/25 – 04/27 Semantics Workshop (Lepore) 04/27  Rutgers Day …

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7:00 pm Reality is Not As It Seems @ The New York Academy of Sciences
Reality is Not As It Seems @ The New York Academy of Sciences
Feb 7 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Despite remarkable strides across virtually all scientific disciplines, the nature of the relationship between our brain and our conscious experience—the “mind-body problem”—remains perhaps the greatest mystery confronting science today. Most neuroscientists currently believe that neural activity in the brain constitutes the foundation of our reality, and that consciousness emerges from the dynamics of complicated neural networks. Yet no scientific theory to date has been able to explain how the properties of such neurons or neural networks actually translates into our specific conscious experiences. The prevalent view in cognitive science today is that we construct our perception of reality in real time. But could we be misinterpreting the content of our perceptual …

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4:00 pm Bioethics Colloquium: Hanna Pickard on The Puzzle of Addiction @ NYU, rm tba
Bioethics Colloquium: Hanna Pickard on The Puzzle of Addiction @ NYU, rm tba
Feb 8 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
The orthodox conception of drug addiction is a neurobiological disease characterised by compulsive drug use despite negative consequences. But this conception depends on three core ideas that are rarely clarified: disease, compulsion, and negative consequences. Pickard argues that it is only when the significance of negative consequences is appreciated that the puzzle of addiction comes clearly into view; and she discusses some conceptual and empirical grounds supporting scepticism about the claim that addiction can be accurately characterised as a form of compulsion, and agnosticism about the claim that addiction is a neurobiological disease. Addiction is better characterized as involving drug choices that, while on the surface puzzling, can be explained …

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4:00 pm Logic, Probability, and Games Seminar @ Faculty House, Columbia U
Logic, Probability, and Games Seminar @ Faculty House, Columbia U
Feb 8 @ 4:00 pm
The seminar is concerned with applying formal methods to fundamental issues, with an emphasis on probabilistic reasoning, decision theory and games. In this context “logic” is broadly interpreted as covering applications that involve formal representations. The topics of interest have been researched within a very broad spectrum of different disciplines, including philosophy (logic and epistemology), statistics, economics, and computer science. The seminar is intended to bring together scholars from different fields of research so as to illuminate problems of common interest from different perspectives. Throughout each academic year, meetings are regularly presented by the members of the seminar and distinguished guest speakers. details tba 02/08/2019 Faculty House, Columbia University 4:00 …

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4:30 pm German Idealism Workshop @ Columbia University, Philosophy rm 716
German Idealism Workshop @ Columbia University, Philosophy rm 716
Feb 8 @ 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm
8 February @Columbia Patricia Kitcher: The Fact of Reason in Kant’s Moral Psychology Response: Jessica Tizzard 22 February @NSSR Matters of Love: A Conference 5 April @Columbia Beatrice Longuenesse: Residues of First Nature 19 April @NSSR Angelica Nuzzo: Approaching Hegel’s Logic Obliquely: Melville, Moliere, Beckett Response: David Carlson 10 May @Columbia Amy Allen: Turning Dead Ends into Through Streets: Psychoanalysis and the Idea of Progress
2:00 pm Ask a Philosopher Booth @ City Point Shopping Center, near Dekalb B/Q
Ask a Philosopher Booth @ City Point Shopping Center, near Dekalb B/Q
Feb 9 @ 2:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Come, ask a philosopher what you will, or just discuss big ideas with your fellow New Yorkers!