Calendar

Jan
27
Sun
Meeting 57: Does God exist? @ Justine's apartment
Jan 27 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Philosophy-in-Manhattan
Sunday, January 27 at 2:00 PM

CUNY philosophy PhD candidate Liam Ryan will lead this discussion. One of the oldest philosophical questions is: does God exist? This week we will exa…

Price: 14.00 USD

Meeting 57: Does God exist?

Sunday, Jan 27, 2019, 2:00 PM

Justine’s apartment
47 East 88th Street New York, NY

1 Members Attending

CUNY philosophy PhD candidate Liam Ryan will lead this discussion. One of the oldest philosophical questions is: does God exist? This week we will examine three traditional arguments for the existence of God that have been discussed since antiquity – the ontological, cosmological, and teleological arguments – and one argument against the existence …

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Jan
28
Mon
Love and Other Drugs @ New York Society for Ethical Culture
Jan 28 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Skye & Massimo’s Philosophy Café
Monday, January 28 at 6:00 PM

Imagine if there really was a “Love Potion Number 9”, or a breakup pill to ameliorate the pain of being dumped. Would you take it? Should you? If so, …

Love and Other Drugs

Monday, Jan 28, 2019, 6:00 PM

New York Society for Ethical Culture
2 W64th St. Manhattan, NY

7 Lovers of Wisdom Attending

Imagine if there really was a “Love Potion Number 9”, or a breakup pill to ameliorate the pain of being dumped. Would you take it? Should you? If so, under what circumstances? And for how long? We’re already medicalizing sexual desire with Viagra and, more recently, the female version Flibanserin – which might help with physical issues, but are the…

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Jan
31
Thu
Brian Epstein, Tufts @ Rutgers Philosophy Dept
Jan 31 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Department Colloquium

Prof. Brian Epstein, Tufts

Thursday, January 31, 2019, 03:00pm – 05:00pm

Feb
1
Fri
Nonsense on Stilts: Science, Pseudoscience & the Need for Critical Thinking @ Strand Book Store
Feb 1 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Skye & Massimo’s Philosophy Café
Friday, February 1 at 7:00 PM

There is good science and bad science. There is quasi-science and pseudo-science. It’s a complex landscape out there, where people can get lost, swaye…

Nonsense on Stilts: Science, Pseudoscience & the Need for Critical Thinking

Friday, Feb 1, 2019, 7:00 PM

Strand Book Store
828 Broadway New York, NY

7 Lovers of Wisdom Attending

There is good science and bad science. There is quasi-science and pseudo-science. It’s a complex landscape out there, where people can get lost, swayed by purveyors of snake oil, big pharmaceutical companies, and a host of other unsavory characters. And yet, we cannot be informed citizens of a 21st century democracy and not know how to think about …

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Feb
2
Sat
Night of Philosophy and Ideas @ Brooklyn Public Library
Feb 2 @ 7:00 pm – Feb 3 @ 7:00 am

A NIGHT OF PHILOSOPHY AND IDEAS is an all-night marathon of philosophical debate, performances, screenings, readings, and music.

Join us and be a part of this FREE 12-HOUR EXCHANGE OF IDEAS, featuring top philosophers from around the world.

FROM SATURDAY February 2 AT 7PM TO SUNDAY February 3, 2019 AT 7AM at Central Library, 10 Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn, NY

Co-presented by Brooklyn Public Library and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy.

Check back for more details in the coming weeks. The full schedule will appear here on January 10.

Feb
5
Tue
Jason D’Cruz (University at Albany, SUNY) @ Rose Hill Campus
Feb 5 @ 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm

Jason D’Cruz (University at Albany, SUNY)

Location: TBD
Rose Hill Campus

Feb
6
Wed
Ethan Hallerman – Philosophy of Technology @ Brooklyn Public Library
Feb 6 @ 7:30 pm

Then the excellent Ethan Hallerman is giving the season’s first Philosophy in the Library talk on February 6th at 7:30 PM – if you’re into the philosophy of technology, you’ll want to come out to this one.

Feb
7
Thu
Liberalism & Democracy Past, Present, Prospects the second of two conferences Organized by James Miller (Professor of Politics, New School for Social Research) Helena Rosenblatt (Professor of History, CUNY Graduate Center) Sponsored by The New School @ John L. Tishman Auditorium, New School
Feb 7 – Feb 8 all-day

Liberal democratic values seem embattled as never before in the United States, and around the world. The time is right for a serious and wide-ranging exploration of the prospects for liberal democracies in a context that acknowledges the historical and contemporary tensions between democracy and liberal values, both in theory and in practice. This conference convenes a varied group of scholars, journalists, policy expert and veteran public servants, we hope to stage a real meeting of the minds, not the usual partisan sniping that occurs at most academic events – and we are trying to be as inclusive as possible, by inviting thoughtful representatives from the left, right, and center.

Though liberalism and democracy have become intertwined in some contemporary societies, they have evolved along quite distinct paths historically. Democracy is an ancient idea, liberalism a very modern one. Greek democracy was not liberal, nor was the revolutionary democracy championed by the sans-culottes in the French Revolution. To this day, there are many avowedly democratic movements and regimes, both on the left and the right, that explicitly reject liberal values. Moreover, even in liberal democratic societies, there are important tensions between the two traditions.

In this conference, we will examine the prospects for liberal democracies against the backdrop of the historical and contemporary tensions between democracy and liberalism.

Featured speakers and participants

James Miller

Helen Rosenblatt

Robert Boyers

Paul Cartledge

EJ Dionne Jr

Bill Galston

Dipayan Ghosh

Jeffrey Issac

James Kloppenberg

Bill Kristol

Yuval Levin

Marc Plattner

Aziz Rana

Rogers Smith

Michael Tomasky

T Chatterton Williams

Ben Fountain

Fedricho Finchelstein

Jennifer Roberts

Paul Krugman

Teresa Ghilarducci

T. Alexander Aleinikoff

Jessica Pissano

Deva Woodly

Natasha Lennard

Astra Taylor

Ira Katrznelson

Josh Begley

Reality is Not As It Seems @ The New York Academy of Sciences
Feb 7 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Despite remarkable strides across virtually all scientific disciplines, the nature of the relationship between our brain and our conscious experience—the “mind-body problem”—remains perhaps the greatest mystery confronting science today. Most neuroscientists currently believe that neural activity in the brain constitutes the foundation of our reality, and that consciousness emerges from the dynamics of complicated neural networks. Yet no scientific theory to date has been able to explain how the properties of such neurons or neural networks actually translates into our specific conscious experiences.

The prevalent view in cognitive science today is that we construct our perception of reality in real time. But could we be misinterpreting the content of our perceptual experiences? According to some cognitive scientists, what we perceive with our brain and our senses does not reflect the true nature of reality. Thus, while evolution has shaped our perceptions to guide adaptive behavior, they argue, it has not enabled us to perceive reality as it actually is. What are the implications of such a radical finding for our understanding of the mystery of consciousness? And how do we distinguish between “normal” and “abnormal” perceptual experiences?

Cognitive scientist Donald D. Hoffman and neurologist Suzanne O’Sullivan join Steve Paulson to discuss the elusive quest to understand the fundamental nature of consciousness, and why our perception of reality is not necessarily what it seems.   

*Reception to follow


This event is part of the Conversations on the Nature of Reality series.

Moderated by journalist Steve Paulson, Executive Producer of Wisconsin Public Radio’s To the Best of Our Knowledge, this three-part series at the New York Academy of Sciences brings together leading scientists and thinkers to explore the fundamental nature of reality through the lens of personal experience and scientific inquiry.

To learn more about each lecture and to purchase tickets, click on the links below.

Feb
12
Tue
Social and Political Philosophy Workshop @ Law School rm 8-01
Feb 12 @ 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm
Meetings are held on Tuesdays at Fordham’s Lincoln Center campus in Manhattan in the Plaza View Room, 12th Floor, Lowenstein Building (113 W. 60th St). We meet from 5:30 to 6:45 and papers are read in advance. If interested in attending, contact sahaddad@fordham.edu or jeflynn@fordham.edu.