Calendar

Sep
18
Wed
“Hustle: The Politics of Language” Jason Stanley. CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Sep 18 @ 5:45 pm

Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information.

 

Download an interactive PDF version of the schedule here.


September 11 • Jonathan Adler Memorial Lecture
Philip Kitcher (Columbia University)
“Progress in the Sciences—and in the Arts”

September 18 • Note: colloquium will begin at 5:45pm
Jason Stanley (Yale University)
“Hustle: The Politics of Language”

September 25 • Note: colloquium will be held in C201/C202
Noël Carroll (CUNY Graduate Center)
“Forget Taste”

October 2
Hayley Clatterbuck (University of Rochester)
TBD

October 23
Michelle M. Dyke (New York University)
“Could Our Epistemic Reasons Be Collective Practical Reasons?”

October 30
Stephen Grover (CUNY Queens College | Graduate Center)
“The Problem of Ugliness”

November 6
Sari Kisilevsky (CUNY Queens College)
TBD

November 13
Taylor Carman (Columbia University)
“Heidegger’s Nietzsche”

November 20
Luvell Anderson (Syracuse University)
TBD

November 27 • Mock Job Talk (Note: attendance limited to CUNY community)
TBD (CUNY Graduate Center)
TBD

December 4 • Mock Job Talk (Note: attendance limited to CUNY community)
TBD (CUNY Graduate Center)
TBD

December 11 • Alumni Day
Elvira Basevich (University of Massachusetts Lowell)
“Du Bois’s Theory of Justice”

Sep
19
Thu
Stoicon-X New York! @ New York Society for Ethical Culture
Sep 19 @ 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Skye & Massimo’s Philosophy Café
Thursday, September 19 at 6:00 PM

What? You can’t make it to the annual Stoicon in Athens, on October 5th? (https://modernstoicism.com/save-the-date-stoicon-2019-in-athens/) Well, that…

Stoicon-X New York!

Thursday, Sep 19, 2019, 6:00 PM

New York Society for Ethical Culture
2 W64th St. Manhattan, NY

10 Lovers of Wisdom Attending

What? You can’t make it to the annual Stoicon in Athens, on October 5th? (https://modernstoicism.com/save-the-date-stoicon-2019-in-athens/) Well, that’s a dispreferred indifferent, of course. But you do have an alternative, if you live in New York City: Stoicon-X New York will take place on Thursday, September 19th, at the Society for Ethical Cultu…

Check out this Meetup →

The Liberal Zionism of the Future. Omri Boehm @ Wolff Conference Room, D1106
Sep 19 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Zionists and anti-Zionists alike agree that Zionism consists in the idea that the Jewish People has the right to their own nation state. They deeply disagree about the legitimacy of such politics. Whereas anti-Zionists maintain that a Jewish State is necessarily discriminatory and even racist, Zionists tend to reject anti-Zionist arguments as anti-Semitic. I argue that both sides of this familiar debate are wrong. (Or worse: all too often, both are right.) A Jewish State indeed cannot be a liberal democracy; and yet Zionist politics — contrary to the consensus held by Zionists and anti-Zionists alike — does not require a Jewish State. That’s a form of Zionism that’s legitimate, important and still viable: the liberal Zionism of the future.

Learn more about the book A Future for Israel, Beyond the Two-State Solution, by Omri Boehm.

Sep
20
Fri
Anti-Exceptionalism about Logic Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center
Sep 20 – Sep 21 all-day

Logic has frequently played an exceptional role in philosophical projects. The laws of logic have been considered self-evident, obvious or a priori, and therefore epistemologically foundational. As a result, logic has been set apart from the other sciences.

According to anti-exceptionalism, however, the privileged epistemological status of logical laws has been exaggerated. Instead, both logical theories and theory-choice in logic are continuous with the theories and methods of other sciences. But what does that tell us about theory-choice in logic, and does it help us adjudicate in the many disputes between rival logical theories?

Speakers:

Jc Beall (UConn)

Christopher Blake-Turner (UNC Chapel Hill)

Ole Hjortland (University of Bergen)

Saul Kripke (CUNY)

Ben Martin (University of Bergen)

Romina Padro (CUNY)

Graham Priest (CUNY)

Marcus Rossberg (UConn)

Lionel Shapiro (UConn)

Stewart Shapiro (OSU)

Gillian Russell (UNC Chapel Hill)

Registration

Registration deadline: September 1, 2019, 9:00am EST

How to register: ole.hjortland @@@@ uib.no

https://philevents.org/event/show/74778

Cognitive Science Speaker Series @ CUNY Grad Center, 6493
Sep 20 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

September 20: Matthias Michel
Philosophy and Laboratoire Sciences, Université Paris-Sorbonne and NYU
“Consciousness and the Prefrontal Cortex”

October 4: Ryan McElhaney
Cognitive Science and Philosophy, CUNY Graduate Center
“Explanation and Consciousness”

October 18: Sascha Benjamin Fink
Philosophy-Neurosciences-Cognition, University of Magdeburg and NYU
“Varieties of Phenomenal Structuralism”

November 1: Jesse Atencio
Cognitive Science and Philosophy, CUNY Graduate Center
Title TBA

November 15: Frank Pupa
Philosophy, Nassau Community College
“Getting Between: Predicativism, Domain Restriction, and Binding”

December 6: Susana Martinez-Conde
Neurology and Integrative Neuroscience, Downstate Medical Center
Title TBA

https://philosophy.commons.gc.cuny.edu/cognitive-speaker-series-fall-2019/

Black Radical Kantianism. Charles Mills (CUNY) @ 302 Philosophy, Columbia U
Sep 20 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

This essay tries to develop a “black radical Kantianism” – that is, a Kantianism informed by the black experience in modernity. After looking briefly at socialist and feminist appropriations of Kant, I argue that an analogous black radical appropriation should draw on the distinctive social ontology and view of the state associated with the black radical tradition. In ethics, this would mean working with a (color-conscious rather than colorblind) social ontology of white persons and black sub-persons and then asking what respect for oneself and others would require under those circumstances. In political philosophy, it would mean framing the state as a Rassenstaat (a racial state) and then asking what measures of corrective justice would be necessary to bring about the ideal Rechtsstaat.

Response by César Cabezas Gamarra.

Presented by the German Idealism Workshop

Autonomy, Deference, and “Getting it Oneself” (ZIDE 自) Justin Tiwald (San Francisco State University) @ Columbia University Religion Dept. 101
Sep 20 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

This paper is on the topic of deliberative autonomy in (primarily) post-classical Chinese moral epistemology. By “deliberative autonomy,” I mean the epistemic state or achievement in which one’s ethical views or beliefs are those that seem right to oneself and are based on reasons or considerations that one understands for oneself. This is to be contrasted with holding a view or belief based primarily on the authority or expertise of others, without seeing for oneself that the view is correct or why it is correct.
The Chinese philosophical tradition is rich in discussion of the nature, value, and function of deliberative autonomy, having much to say both in its defense and against it. I will focus my discussion by looking more closely at what Neo-Confucians have said about a particular term of art, zide 自得 (“getting it oneself”). I translate and discuss some passages on “getting it oneself” in the works and recorded lessons of influential Song, Ming, and Qing Confucians, note different types of deliberative autonomy implied by these passages, and discuss Wm. Theodore de Bary’s famous explication of “getting it oneself.” I consider whether the premium these Confucians placed on zide has the implications for liberal education that de Bary proposes and describe how proponents of zide could respond to formidable and important Xunzian arguments for deference to traditions and expertise.

With responses from: KATJA VOGT (Columbia University)

The Fall dates for the Comparative Philosophy seminar:

September 20 – Justin Tiwald (San Francisco State University)
October 11 – Richard Kim (Loyola University, Chicago
November 8 – Sungmoon Kim (City University of Hong Kong)
December 6 – Paul R. Goldin (University of Pennsylvania)

More details (such as titles, abstracts, and respondents) to follow. Looking forward to seeing you soon.

Hagop Sarkissian
Associate Professor & Chair, Department of Philosophy, The City University of New York, Baruch College
Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy, CUNY Graduate Center 
Co-Director, Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy

Sep
21
Sat
Ask a Philosopher Booth @ McCarren Park Greenmarket
Sep 21 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

You should come to one of the three (3) Ask a Philosopher booths we have scheduled for the month of September!

Saturday 9/7, 10:00-2:00 @ the Borough Hall Greenmarket
Saturday 9/14, 11:00-3:00 @ the Market at the Brooklyn Museum
Saturday 9/21, 10:00-2:00 @ the McCarren Park Greenmarket

Sep
22
Sun
Meeting 62, take 2: Philosophy of Math (11am-1pm) @ Justine's apartment
Sep 22 @ 11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Philosophy-in-Manhattan
Sunday, September 22 at 11:00 AM

Due to overwhelming interesting in this topic, we’re going to have an additional Philosophy of Math meeting on September 22. This one will be from 11a…

Price: 14.00 USD

Meeting 62, take 2: Philosophy of Math (11am-1pm)

Sunday, Sep 22, 2019, 11:00 AM

Justine’s apartment
47 East 88th Street New York, NY

2 Members Attending

Due to overwhelming interesting in this topic, we’re going to have an additional Philosophy of Math meeting on September 22. This one will be from 11am-1pm. PLEASE NOTE: this is an ADDITIONAL meeting. We are NOT canceling or rescheduling the original meeting from 2pm-4pm. That meeting will still take place. The 11am meeting will be substantially t…

Check out this Meetup →

Meeting 62: Philosophy of Math @ Justine's apartment
Sep 22 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Philosophy-in-Manhattan
Sunday, September 22 at 2:00 PM

CUNY philosophy PhD candidate Vincent Peluce will lead us. What sort of things are mathematical truths about? How do we come to know mathematical trut…

Price: 14.00 USD

Meeting 62: Philosophy of Math

Sunday, Sep 22, 2019, 2:00 PM

Justine’s apartment
47 East 88th Street New York, NY

1 Members Attending

CUNY philosophy PhD candidate Vincent Peluce will lead us. What sort of things are mathematical truths about? How do we come to know mathematical truths? How does this knowledge fit in with the rest of our knowledge? In this meeting, we examine these questions and briefly discuss some answers to those questions. The reading can be found here: http…

Check out this Meetup →