Calendar

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Mesthene Lecture, Prof. Miranda Fricker (GC-CUNY) 3:00 pm
Mesthene Lecture, Prof. Miranda Fricker (GC-CUNY) @ Rutgers Philosophy Dept. 5th floor Seminar Rm.
Mar 1 @ 3:00 pm – 6:30 pm
The Department’s colloquium series typically meets on Thursdays in the Seminar Room at Gateway Bldg, 106 Somerset Street, 5th Floor. 2/27/18 Goldman Lecture, 4pm 3/1/18 Mesthene Lecture, Prof. Miranda Fricker (GC-CUNY), 3:00-6:30 pm 3/22/18 RU Climate Lecture, Prof. Sally Haslanger (MIT) 3:00-5:00 pm 4/8/18 Karen Bennett (Cornell University) 4/12/18 Sanders Lecture, Prof. Linda Zagzebski (University of Oklahoma) 4/13/18 Rutgers Chinese Philosophy Conference, 9:30 am-6:30 pm 4/13-4/14/18 Marilyn McCord Adams Memorial Conference 4/14-4/15/18 Rutgers-Columbia Undergraduate Philosophy Conference (held at Columbia University) 4/17/18 Class of 1970’s Lecture, Prof. Jeremy Waldron (NYU), Alexander Teleconference Lecture Hall, 4:30-7:30 pm 5/21-5/25/18 Metaphysical Mayhem 6/8-6/9/18 Pantheism Workshop 7/8-7/15/18 Summer Institute for Diversity in Philosophy (held at …

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Spring MaP Colloquium: “More than Fair: How Excessive Sympathy for Him (“Himpathy”) Obscures and Causes Misogyny” Kate Manne (Cornell) 4:30 pm
Spring MaP Colloquium: “More than Fair: How Excessive Sympathy for Him (“Himpathy”) Obscures and Causes Misogyny” Kate Manne (Cornell) @ Wolff Conference Room, D1103
Mar 1 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
According to my ameliorative definition, misogyny is, roughly, the “law enforcement” branch of patriarchy, which serves to police, enforce, or restore patriarchal social order—often by visiting hostility on girls and women for perceived violations of gendered norms and expectations. As well as complementary ideologies (most notably, sexism), there is also the flipside of misogyny which deserves to be considered: the exonerating narratives and excessive sympathy of which comparatively privileged men tend to be the beneficiaries. I call the latter ‘himpathy.’ This talk departs from the main example of himpathy I discuss in my recent book, Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny: that of Brock Turner, the convicted sexual assailant and then student …

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Nic Porot 1:00 pm
Nic Porot @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 7-102
Mar 2 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
PoPRocks (formerly known as ‘WoPoP’) is an ongoing series in the NYC area for early career researchers – typically grad students and postdocs – working on philosophy of psychology/mind/perception/cognitive science/neuroscience/… . We usually meet roughly once every 2 weeks to informally discuss a draft paper by one of our members, but Spring 2018 we will be meeting less frequently. Typically presenters send a copy of their paper around 1 week in advance, so do join the mailing list (by emailing poprocksworkshop@gmail.com or one of the organizers) or email to ask for a copy of the paper. We aim for a friendly, constructive discussion with the understanding that the drafts discussed …

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Virginia Aspe Armella and Ma. Elena García Peláez Cruz 2:00 pm
Virginia Aspe Armella and Ma. Elena García Peláez Cruz @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Mar 2 @ 2:00 pm – 4:30 pm
SWIP-Analytic Schedule for Spring 2018 Here is a sneak peak at our exciting line-up of speakers and events for Spring 2018. Some times and rooms TBA. Elanor Taylor, February 8, CUNY Graduate Center, The Committee for Interdisciplinary Science Studies, Room 5307, 4:00-6:00pm Virginia Aspe Armella and Ma. Elena García Peláez Cruz (co-sponsored with SWIP-Analytic Mexico), March 2, NYU Room 202, 2:00-4:30pm Round Table Women in Philosophy: Publishing, Jobs, and Fitting In (co-sponsored with NYSWIP), March 8, CUNY Graduate Center, The Committee for Interdisciplinary Science Studies, Room 5307, 4:30-7:30pm Graduate Student Essay Prize Winner Presentation, April 12 Sophie Horowitz (UMass, Amherst), April 26
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Recent Work in Decision Theory and Epistemology Workshop
Recent Work in Decision Theory and Epistemology Workshop @ Philosophy Hall rm 716
Mar 3 all-day
Speakers: Jennifer Carr (University of California, San Diego) Ryan Doody (Hebrew University of Jerusalem) Harvey Lederman (Princeton University) Chris Meacham (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) Organizer: Melissa Fusco (Columbia University) 9:30 – 10:00 Breakfast (716 Philosophy Hall) SESSION I Chair: Melissa Fusco 10:00 – 11:30 Jennifer Carr: “Can Accuracy Motivate Modesty?” 11:30 – 11:45 Coffee Break I SESSION II Chair: Jessica John Collins 11:45 – 1:15 Ryan Doody: “Hard Choices Made Harder” 1:15 – 2:30 Lunch SESSION III Chair: Jennifer Carr 2:30 – 4:00 Harvey Lederman: “Verbalism” 4:00 – 4:30 Coffee Break II SESSION IV Chair: Ryan Doody 4:30 – 6:00 Chris Meacham: “Decision in Cases of Infinitely Many Utility Contributions” …

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The Social Responsibility of Intellectuals Conference
The Social Responsibility of Intellectuals Conference @ Wolff Conference Room, D1103
Mar 3 all-day
Many academics work on issues of social justice, and in this politically tumultuous moment, we want to ask: What is our social responsibility as academics? What does it mean to assume this responsibility? In response to the untimely suspension of all Cultural Studies & Comparative Literature programs at Stony Brook University, the final graduate conference (co-sponsored by Minorities and Philosophy, NSSR) will be an interdisciplinary event where we aim to confront the limitations of our position as academics and conceive possibilities for moving beyond those limitations. Schedule 9:45–10:15     Participant Registration/ Coffee & Bagels 10:15–10:30   Opening Remarks 10:30–12:00   Panel 1: Humanities & Political Insight 10:30–11:00  Amy Cook (Associate Professor of Theatre …

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Evidence and Theory in Neuroscience – Seminars in Society and Neuroscience 4:15 pm
Evidence and Theory in Neuroscience – Seminars in Society and Neuroscience @ Faculty House, Columbia U
Mar 5 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
What constitutes evidence is rarely self-evident. We need theories to make sense of evidence—to transform patterns of physical occurrences into something meaningful, i.e., data. This relationship between theory and evidence is often at least partially opaque, particularly in a field like neuroscience that often aims to use physical evidence to characterize mental, and in some cases social, events. Neuroscience navigates this relationship by purporting to offer mechanistic descriptions of “how” mental processes operate. Yet, this inquiry relies on theoretical assumptions that are not fully tethered to data. Neuroscience can certainly generate predictions from theories that have practical implications and link them with mechanistic knowledge of the physical (e.g., anatomy and …

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Hindus Against God: Anti-theistic Arguments in Sāṃkhya and Vedānta Philosophy – Andrew Nicholson (SUNY Stony Brook) 4:15 pm
Hindus Against God: Anti-theistic Arguments in Sāṃkhya and Vedānta Philosophy – Andrew Nicholson (SUNY Stony Brook) @ Knox Hall, Room 208
Mar 5 @ 4:15 pm – 5:45 pm
Moderated by Sheldon Pollock, Arvind Raghunathan Professor of South Asian Studies, MESAAS Andrew J. Nicholson is Associate Professor at State University of New York at Stony Brook. He earned his PhD in South Asian Languages and Civilizations at Chicago.  Nicholson’s primary area of research is Indian philosophy and intellectual history, most recently focusing on medieval Vedānta philosophy and its influence on ideas about Hinduism in modern Europe and India. His first book, Unifying Hinduism: Philosophy and Identity in Indian Intellectual History (2010) was part of the South Asia Across the Disciplines book series sponsored by the university presses at California, Chicago, and Columbia.  In 2011, it won the American Academy of …

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Logic & Metaphysics Workshop 4:15 pm
Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 3309
Mar 5 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
Feb 26 Martin Pleitz, Muenster Mar 5 Vera Flocke, NYU Mar 12 Roy Sorensen, WUSTL Mar 19 Alex Citkin, Private Researcher Mar 26 Chris Scambler, NYU Apr 2 SPRING RECESS. NO MEETING Apr 9 Greg Restall, Melbourne Apr 16 Daniel Nolan, Notre Dame Apr 23 Mel Fitting, CUNY Apr 30 Sungil Han, Seoul National May 7 Andreas Ditter, NYU May14 Rohit Parikh
The Metasemantics of Indefinite Extensibility – Vera Flocke (NYU) 4:15 pm
The Metasemantics of Indefinite Extensibility – Vera Flocke (NYU) @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 3309
Mar 5 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
Indefinite extensibility is the thesis that any domain of quantification can always be expanded. But how is the possibility of expanding domains of quantification reflected in the semantics of quantified sentences? This paper discusses the relevant meta-semantic options within a framework that distinguishes between semantic values and assertoric contents. This choice of a framework is independently motivated, helps received accounts of indefinite extensibility to escape weighty objections and adds to the available metasemantic options. I then argue for a hitherto overlooked view according to which quantified sentences express stable semantic values but variable assertoric contents. Specifically, the semantic value of quantified sentences are sets of possible worlds that are structured …

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Philosophy of Language Workshop 6:30 pm
Philosophy of Language Workshop @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 302
Mar 5 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
29 January Gillian Russell (UNC) 5 February Mandy Simons (CMU) 12 February (No Workshop) 19 February (No Workshop) 26 February Daniel Rothschild (UCL) 5 March Chris Kennedy (UChicago) 12 March Rachel Sterken (Oslo) 19 March No Workshop (NYU Spring Break) 26 March Andreas Stokke (Uppsala) 2 April Rebekah Baglini (Stanford) 9 April Henry Schiller (UT Austin) 16 April Gary Ostertag (CUNY) 23 April Manuel Križ (Jean Nicod) 30 April Maria Aloni (ILLC/Amsterdam) 7 May Alexis Wellwood (USC)
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Mind and Language Research Seminar 4:00 pm
Mind and Language Research Seminar @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Mar 6 @ 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our topic for Spring 2018 will be Formal Frameworks for Semantics and Pragmatics. We’ll be investigating a range of questions in semantics and/or pragmatics which involve or are relevant to the choice between different kinds of overall structure for theories in these areas. In most sessions, the members of the seminar will receive a week in advance, copies of recent work, or work in progress from a thinker at another university. After reading this work, students discuss it with one of the instructors on the day before the colloquium. Then at the Tuesday colloquium, the instructors give a summary review and raise criticisms or questions about the work. The author …

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Minorities and Philosophy Spring Workshop Series 7:00 pm
Minorities and Philosophy Spring Workshop Series @ Various Locations around NYC
Mar 6 @ 7:00 pm – 9:30 pm
The Minorities and Philosophy (MAP) Chapters of Columbia, The New School, Rutgers, CUNY, NYU, and Princeton invite submissions from graduate students and postdoctoral fellows from underrepresented groups for a workshop series (NY-MAPWorks) in spring 2018. Dates: Jan 30th (NYU), Feb. 20th (New School), March 6th (CUNY), April 17th (Columbia), May 8th (NYU), 7-9:30pm. Submission Guidelines: To apply, please compete the following by December 15th, 2017: Send an extended abstract of 750-1,000 words (.pdf or .doc), prepared for blind review, suitable for a 25-30 minute presentation to a general philosophical audience to nymapshop@gmail.com. Provide your contact information by completing this google form. Applications will only be accepted from individuals from groups …

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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Mar 7 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. February 7th • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture David Papineau (CUNY Graduate Center | King’s College London) “Kinds and Essences: Taming Metaphysical Modality” February 14th Jane Friedman (NYU) “The Epistemic and the Zetetic” February 21st Muhammad Ali Khalidi (York U) “Are Sexes Natural Kinds?” February 28th Laurie Paul (UNC) “De Se Truth and Epistemic Revolution” March 7th • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture Steven Lukes (NYU) Title TBD March 14th Collin O’Neill (CUNY Lehman College) “Consent and Third-Party Coercion in Medicine and Research” March 21st Edouard Machery (Pittsburgh) TBD …

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“Sextus Empiricus’ Fourth Conditional and Containment Logic” Yale Weiss (CUNY) 2:00 pm
“Sextus Empiricus’ Fourth Conditional and Containment Logic” Yale Weiss (CUNY) @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 8203
Mar 8 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
In a famous passage from Outlines of Pyrrhonism, Sextus Empiricus presents four different accounts of the conditional in increasing strength. Contemporary analogues have been identified (subject to various degrees of controversy) for the first three, but the last, which even fails to satisfy A>A, has proved elusive. In this talk, I discuss ways of modeling this heterodox conditional. Taking a cue from Sextus, I regard the characteristic feature of this conditional as one of proper (conceptual) containment and approach it using the framework of containment logic. Different implementations of this approach are discussed and evaluated both for their historical and technical merits. In the course of the talk, I will …

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Round Table Women in Philosophy: Publishing, Jobs, and Fitting In 4:30 pm
Round Table Women in Philosophy: Publishing, Jobs, and Fitting In @ CUNY Grad Center
Mar 8 @ 4:30 pm – 7:30 pm
SWIP-Analytic Schedule for Spring 2018 Here is a sneak peak at our exciting line-up of speakers and events for Spring 2018. Some times and rooms TBA. Elanor Taylor, February 8, CUNY Graduate Center, The Committee for Interdisciplinary Science Studies, Room 5307, 4:00-6:00pm Virginia Aspe Armella and Ma. Elena García Peláez Cruz (co-sponsored with SWIP-Analytic Mexico), March 2, NYU Room 202, 2:00-4:30pm Round Table Women in Philosophy: Publishing, Jobs, and Fitting In (co-sponsored with NYSWIP), March 8, CUNY Graduate Center, The Committee for Interdisciplinary Science Studies, Room 5307, 4:30-7:30pm Graduate Student Essay Prize Winner Presentation, April 12 Sophie Horowitz (UMass, Amherst), April 26
Working Papers in Ethics and Moral Psychology 5:30 pm
Working Papers in Ethics and Moral Psychology @ Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Anneberg 12-15
Mar 8 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Working Papers in Ethics and Moral Psychology is a speaker series conducted under the auspices of the Icahn School of Medicine Bioethics Program. It is a working group where speakers are invited to present well-developed, as yet unpublished work. The focus of the group is interdisciplinary, with an emphasis on topics in ethics, bioethics, neuroethics, and moral psychology. The meetings begin with a brief presentation by the invited speaker and the remaining time is devoted to a discussion of the paper. The speakers will make their papers available in advance of their presentation to those who sign up for the Working Papers mailing list. All speakers: 9/28/2017: Eric Chwang /Rutgers …

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Racial Inequality Conference
Racial Inequality Conference @ CUNY Grad Center: Skylight rm 9100, Elebash Recital Hall
Mar 9 – Mar 10 all-day
The United States, supposedly founded on the “self-evident” principle of human equality, has in fact been a profoundly racially unequal society from the start. Yet for many years the striving for racial justice and racial equality has been obscured by an evasive discourse of “diversity.” Particularly with the recent rise of white nationalism, however, it has become urgently important to recognize and address the ongoing inequalities of race. This 2-day interdisciplinary conference will bring together 18 theorists from a wide array of subjects—philosophy, political theory, ethnic studies, critical psychology, urban studies, gender theory, and anthropology—to look from their distinctive perspectives at the enduring problem of racial inequality, and how it …

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Cognitive Science Speaker Series 1:00 pm
Cognitive Science Speaker Series @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 7-102
Mar 9 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
February 9: Jessie Munton Philosophy, New York University “How Long Is ‘a’ Visual Experience?” March 9: Taylor Webb Neuroscience Institute and Cognitive Science, Princeton University Title TBA April 13: Eleni Manolakaki Philosophy and History of Science, University of Athens “Propositions as Measures of Mind” For spring 2018, the CUNY Cognitive Science Speaker Series will meet once a month. We’ll return to weekly talks in fall 2018. All talks are at the CUNY Graduate Center, 365 Fifth Avenue, room 7-102, Fridays, 1-3 pm. http://bit.ly/cs-talks
The Authority of Pleasure: A Neglected Alternative in Aesthetics – Keren Gorodeisky (Auburn Univ.) 3:30 pm
The Authority of Pleasure: A Neglected Alternative in Aesthetics – Keren Gorodeisky (Auburn Univ.) @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Mar 9 @ 3:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Does art have anything interesting to do with pleasure? The aesthetic hedonist answers positively, claiming that the value of artworks qua artworks lie in their power to please those who are properly engaged with them. Recent critics of hedonism answer the question in the negative, arguing that the power to please cannot properly explain the value of artworks. In this paper, I point to a blind spot in the dialectic between the hedonic orthodoxy and its recent critics: though the hedonist is wrong to claim that artworks are valuable because they are endowed with the power to please, the contemporary critic of hedonism mistakenly disconnects art from pleasure. The bulk of the paper consists in a …

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The Paradox of Apology – Francey Russell (Yale) 4:00 pm
The Paradox of Apology – Francey Russell (Yale) @ room D1206
Mar 9 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Apology constitutes an essential part of the hard work of being an imperfect moral agent, over time and amongst others.  Apology is one component of our “reparative responsibilities” (Bell 2012), of responding well to one’s past wrongdoing, and is more broadly part of the ongoing effort to come to terms with what one’s deeds will mean for one’s life (Williams 69).  So how is this work achieved?   In this paper I argue that the basic structure of apology is more puzzling, because more paradoxical, than has been recognized.  I argue that in apologizing one must at once identify with one’s wrong action, in order to take moral responsibility for …

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Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy 5:30 pm
Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy @ Columbia Religion Dept. rm 101
Mar 9 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Feb. 9: Cat Prueitt (George Mason University) March 9: Kin Cheung (Moravian College) April 13: Lara Braitstein (McGill University) May 11: David Cummiskey (Bates College) Also, please visit our website: http://www.cbs.columbia.edu/cscp/ Co-Chairs Professor Jonathan Gold Associate Professor, Princeton University, Department of Religion jcgold@princeton.edu Professor Hagop Sarkissian Associate Professor, The City University of New York, Baruch College | Graduate Center, Department of Philosophy hagop.sarkissian@baruch.cuny.edu Rapporteur Jay Ramesh jr3203@columbia.edu
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Confessing to a Superfluous Premise – Roy Sorensen (WUSTL) 4:15 pm
Confessing to a Superfluous Premise – Roy Sorensen (WUSTL) @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 3309
Mar 12 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
In a hurried letter to beleaguered brethren, Blaise Pascal (1658) confesses to a lapse of concision: “I have made this longer than usual because I have not had time to make it shorter.”  Pascal’s confession was emulated with the same warmth as philosophers now emulate the apology introduced by D. C. Mackinson’s “The Preface Paradox”. Could Pascal’s confession of superfluity be sound? Pascal thinks his letter could be conservatively abridged; the shortened letter would be true and have the exact same content. In contrast to the Preface Paradox, where Mackinson’s author apologizes for false assertions, Pascal apologizes for an excess of true assertions. He believes at least one of his …

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Logic & Metaphysics Workshop 4:15 pm
Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 3309
Mar 12 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
Feb 26 Martin Pleitz, Muenster Mar 5 Vera Flocke, NYU Mar 12 Roy Sorensen, WUSTL Mar 19 Alex Citkin, Private Researcher Mar 26 Chris Scambler, NYU Apr 2 SPRING RECESS. NO MEETING Apr 9 Greg Restall, Melbourne Apr 16 Daniel Nolan, Notre Dame Apr 23 Mel Fitting, CUNY Apr 30 Sungil Han, Seoul National May 7 Andreas Ditter, NYU May14 Rohit Parikh
Philosophy of Language Workshop 6:30 pm
Philosophy of Language Workshop @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 302
Mar 12 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
29 January Gillian Russell (UNC) 5 February Mandy Simons (CMU) 12 February (No Workshop) 19 February (No Workshop) 26 February Daniel Rothschild (UCL) 5 March Chris Kennedy (UChicago) 12 March Rachel Sterken (Oslo) 19 March No Workshop (NYU Spring Break) 26 March Andreas Stokke (Uppsala) 2 April Rebekah Baglini (Stanford) 9 April Henry Schiller (UT Austin) 16 April Gary Ostertag (CUNY) 23 April Manuel Križ (Jean Nicod) 30 April Maria Aloni (ILLC/Amsterdam) 7 May Alexis Wellwood (USC)
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Social and Political Philosophy Workshop 5:30 pm
Social and Political Philosophy Workshop @ Plaza View Room, 12th Flr, Lowenstein
Mar 13 @ 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm
September 26 – Matthias Fritsch (Concordia), “Deconstructive Normativity” October 10 – TBA November 7 – Dimitris Vardoulakis (Western Sydney) February 13 – Candice Delmas (Northeastern) March 13 – Robert Gooding-Williams (Columbia) April 17 – Serene Khader (Brooklyn College/CUNY Grad Center) Meetings are held on Tuesdays at Fordham’s Lincoln Center campus in Manhattan in the Plaza View Room, 12th Floor, Lowenstein Building (113 W. 60th St). We meet from 5:30 to 6:45 and papers are read in advance. If interested in attending, contact sahaddad@fordham.edu or jeflynn@fordham.edu. ​
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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Mar 14 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. February 7th • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture David Papineau (CUNY Graduate Center | King’s College London) “Kinds and Essences: Taming Metaphysical Modality” February 14th Jane Friedman (NYU) “The Epistemic and the Zetetic” February 21st Muhammad Ali Khalidi (York U) “Are Sexes Natural Kinds?” February 28th Laurie Paul (UNC) “De Se Truth and Epistemic Revolution” March 7th • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture Steven Lukes (NYU) Title TBD March 14th Collin O’Neill (CUNY Lehman College) “Consent and Third-Party Coercion in Medicine and Research” March 21st Edouard Machery (Pittsburgh) TBD …

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Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar” [Live Reading] 7:00 pm
Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar” [Live Reading] @ Elizabeth's apartment
Mar 15 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Brooklyn Philosophy Reading and Discussion Group Thursday, March 15 at 7:00 PM We’ll pick parts at the beginning of the night and read through it together, following with a discussion. Copies provided and no advance reading neces… https://www.meetup.com/Brooklyn-Philosophy-Reading-and-Discussion-Group/events/247534687/
Truth in Politics – Louise Antony (UMass Amherst) 7:30 pm
Truth in Politics – Louise Antony (UMass Amherst) @ Brooklyn Public Library, Dweck Center
Mar 15 @ 7:30 pm
“Is Truth Dead?” asked Time Magazine last year. Since people clearly care about the truth, at least in mundane matters, truth is alive. If an airline agent tells you the flight to Dallas is leaving from Gate B16, you expect the flight to Dallas to be leaving from Gate B16, and complain sorely if it’s not. But if the truth does still matter, why do we elect people who don’t seem to care what the truth is? The answer to this question, argues philosopher Louise Antony, has partly to do with the structure of human knowledge, and partly to do with the structure of our society. We can’t do anything …

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A Lawyer, A Poet, and A Philosopher walk into a bar to talk about INNOCENCE 8:00 pm
A Lawyer, A Poet, and A Philosopher walk into a bar to talk about INNOCENCE @ Las Tapas Bar and Restaurant
Mar 15 @ 8:00 pm
Young and innocent. Innocent until proven guilty. Is the loss (or theft) of innocence a crime? Or is innocence among the mature a vice? Do the innocent make good citizens? Can innocence lost ever be regained? How are our different conceptions of innocence related? Join us in this communal investigation and help us understand. Thursday, March 15, 2018 at 8p.m. At Las Tapas Bar and Restaurant, 808 W 187th Street, New York, NY 10033. (Take the A Train) Admission is $15, which includes one complimentary tapa and drink.  Reservations are recommended. (646.590.0142) Leo Glickman is a partner in Stoll, Glickman & Bellina, LLP. He has devoted his professional life of …

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Meeting 52: Philosophy of Law 2:00 pm
Meeting 52: Philosophy of Law @ Justine's apartment
Mar 18 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Philosophy-in-Manhattan Sunday, March 18 at 2:00 PM CUNY philosophy PhD candidate Vincent Peluce will lead this discussion. What is law? In order for something to be correctly considered law, need onl… Price: 12.00 USD https://www.meetup.com/Philosophy-in-Manhattan/events/248118163/
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Admissibility of Multiple-Conclusion Rules of Logics with the Disjunction Property (Alex Citkin) 4:15 pm
Admissibility of Multiple-Conclusion Rules of Logics with the Disjunction Property (Alex Citkin) @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 3309
Mar 19 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
I study admissible multiple-conclusion rules of logics having the meta-disjunction expressible by a finite set of formulas. I show that in such logics the bases of admissible single- and multiple-conclusion rules can be converted into each other. Since these conversions are constructive and preserve cardinality, it is possible to obtain a simple way of constructing a base of admissible single-conclusion rules, by a given base of admissible multiple-conclusion rules and vice versa. Because the proofs are purely syntactical, these results can be applied to a broad class of logics. Logic & Metaphysics Workshop Feb 26 Martin Pleitz, Muenster Mar 5 Vera Flocke, NYU Mar 12 Roy Sorensen, WUSTL Mar 19 …

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Logic & Metaphysics Workshop 4:15 pm
Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 3309
Mar 19 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
Feb 26 Martin Pleitz, Muenster Mar 5 Vera Flocke, NYU Mar 12 Roy Sorensen, WUSTL Mar 19 Alex Citkin, Private Researcher Mar 26 Chris Scambler, NYU Apr 2 SPRING RECESS. NO MEETING Apr 9 Greg Restall, Melbourne Apr 16 Daniel Nolan, Notre Dame Apr 23 Mel Fitting, CUNY Apr 30 Sungil Han, Seoul National May 7 Andreas Ditter, NYU May14 Rohit Parikh
Magical Art: The Power of Images in Hitchcock’s Vertigo 6:00 pm
Magical Art: The Power of Images in Hitchcock’s Vertigo @ Cornelia Street Cafe
Mar 19 @ 6:00 pm
Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo is a brilliant, suspenseful mystery exploring the often dangerous intimacy between love, compulsion, and death.  It is also a profound meditation on the power of art.  While it invites us to go on seeing art as a mimesis – a “representation,” or “imitation” of life – it also cryptically asks whether art objects might do more than merely represent life, even whether they might exercise power over death. James Stewart’s Scotty has been compared to Orpheus in quest of Eurydice; I suggest that he’s worth comparing to Admetus, who wished he could be Orpheus, and who imagines clinging to a statue to recapture his lost wife. The …

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Consistency Conditions on Fundamental Physics – Rachel Rosen (Columbia University). 2:10 pm
Consistency Conditions on Fundamental Physics – Rachel Rosen (Columbia University). @ Columbia University Philosophy Dept.
Mar 20 @ 2:10 pm – 4:00 pm
as our understanding of the universe and its basic building blocks extends to shorter and shorter distances, experiments capable of probing these scales are becoming increasingly difficult to construct. Fundamental particle physics faces a potential crisis: an absence of data at the shortest possible scales. Yet remarkably, even in the absence of experimental data, the requirement of theoretical consistency puts stringent constraints on viable models of fundamental particles and their interactions. In this talk I’ll present some of these constraints and discuss their applications for cosmology, string theory and more. There will be dinner after the talk. If you are interested, please send an email with “Dinner” in the heading …

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Mind and Language Research Seminar 4:00 pm
Mind and Language Research Seminar @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Mar 20 @ 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our topic for Spring 2018 will be Formal Frameworks for Semantics and Pragmatics. We’ll be investigating a range of questions in semantics and/or pragmatics which involve or are relevant to the choice between different kinds of overall structure for theories in these areas. In most sessions, the members of the seminar will receive a week in advance, copies of recent work, or work in progress from a thinker at another university. After reading this work, students discuss it with one of the instructors on the day before the colloquium. Then at the Tuesday colloquium, the instructors give a summary review and raise criticisms or questions about the work. The author …

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Epistemology and Ethics Workshop 5:30 pm
Epistemology and Ethics Workshop @ Plaza View Room, 12th Flr, Lowenstein
Mar 20 @ 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm
The Epistemology and Ethics group is composed of faculty and graduate students at Fordham and other nearby universities. Papers are read in advance, so the majority of the time is devoted to questions and discussion. If interested in attending, email dheney[at]fordham[dot]edu. September 19th  Kate Manne (Cornell) October 17th  Sandy Goldberg (Northwestern) November 14th  Eden Lin (Ohio State) February 27th  Nathan Ballantyne (Fordham) March 20th  Sophie Horowitz (UMass, Amherst) April 24th  Nomy Arpaly (Brown)
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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Mar 21 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. February 7th • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture David Papineau (CUNY Graduate Center | King’s College London) “Kinds and Essences: Taming Metaphysical Modality” February 14th Jane Friedman (NYU) “The Epistemic and the Zetetic” February 21st Muhammad Ali Khalidi (York U) “Are Sexes Natural Kinds?” February 28th Laurie Paul (UNC) “De Se Truth and Epistemic Revolution” March 7th • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture Steven Lukes (NYU) Title TBD March 14th Collin O’Neill (CUNY Lehman College) “Consent and Third-Party Coercion in Medicine and Research” March 21st Edouard Machery (Pittsburgh) TBD …

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Scientific Philosophy from Kant to Kuhn and Beyond – Michael Friedman (Stanford) 6:15 pm
Scientific Philosophy from Kant to Kuhn and Beyond – Michael Friedman (Stanford) @ NYU Law School, Lipton Hall
Mar 21 @ 6:15 pm – 8:15 pm
Abstract: These lectures report on my recent work in tracing out a path through a variety of philosophical attempts to appropriate developments in contemporaneous science on behalf of an evolving conception of “scientific” philosophy beginning with Kant and extending to the present.  I concentrate, in particular, on Kant and the post-Kantian tradition.  This includes the Naturphilosophie of Schelling and Hegel, the neo-Kantian reaction to Naturphilosophie initiated by Helmholtz, and the ensuing contributions to nineteenth and early twentieth century philosophy and science by Mach, Poincaré, and Einstein.  I then consider the neo-Kantianism of Ernst Cassirer and (yes) Thomas Kuhn, which finally leads to my own attempt to develop a post-Kuhnian approach to …

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RU Climate Lecture, Prof. Sally Haslanger (MIT) 3:00 pm
RU Climate Lecture, Prof. Sally Haslanger (MIT) @ Rutgers Philosophy Dept. 5th floor Seminar Rm.
Mar 22 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
The Department’s colloquium series typically meets on Thursdays in the Seminar Room at Gateway Bldg, 106 Somerset Street, 5th Floor. 2/27/18 Goldman Lecture, 4pm 3/1/18 Mesthene Lecture, Prof. Miranda Fricker (GC-CUNY), 3:00-6:30 pm 3/22/18 RU Climate Lecture, Prof. Sally Haslanger (MIT) 3:00-5:00 pm 4/8/18 Karen Bennett (Cornell University) 4/12/18 Sanders Lecture, Prof. Linda Zagzebski (University of Oklahoma) 4/13/18 Rutgers Chinese Philosophy Conference, 9:30 am-6:30 pm 4/13-4/14/18 Marilyn McCord Adams Memorial Conference 4/14-4/15/18 Rutgers-Columbia Undergraduate Philosophy Conference (held at Columbia University) 4/17/18 Class of 1970’s Lecture, Prof. Jeremy Waldron (NYU), Alexander Teleconference Lecture Hall, 4:30-7:30 pm 5/21-5/25/18 Metaphysical Mayhem 6/8-6/9/18 Pantheism Workshop 7/8-7/15/18 Summer Institute for Diversity in Philosophy (held at …

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Boethius’ “The Consolation of Philosophy” – Books 1-3 7:00 pm
Boethius’ “The Consolation of Philosophy” – Books 1-3 @ Elizabeth's apartment
Mar 22 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Brooklyn Philosophy Reading and Discussion Group Thursday, March 22 at 7:00 PM Written to comfort both himself and his similarly distressed readers, this work by Boethius–in a nod to traditional Latin ‘consolatio’ form–sets him… https://www.meetup.com/Brooklyn-Philosophy-Reading-and-Discussion-Group/events/247534475/
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21st Annual CUNY Graduate Philosophy Conference: Self and Other
21st Annual CUNY Graduate Philosophy Conference: Self and Other @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9206
Mar 23 all-day
The 21st Annual CUNY Graduate Philosophy Conference will take place on March 23rd, 2018 at the CUNY Graduate Center (365 5th Avenue). This year’s theme is “Self and Other”, broadly construed. The program below features Dr. Akeel Bilgrami (Columbia) and Dr. Daniel Kolak (William Paterson University) as keynote speakers. Eight graduate students from departments across the U.S. and abroad will give 30-minute talks spanning a broad array of philosophical research areas. Click the links to download PDFs of the the conference flyer and schedule of talks. Time / Title / Speaker / Affiliation 8:30-9 AM / BREAKFAST 9-9:30 AM / Embedded Love: What it Means for / Love to Structure Your Will …

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Waiting, Watching, Acting: Immediate and Deferred Responses to Political Crisis
Waiting, Watching, Acting: Immediate and Deferred Responses to Political Crisis @ Columbia University Philosophy Dept. 702
Mar 23 all-day
Waiting, Watching, Acting: Immediate and Deferred Responses to Political Crisis Friday, March 23rd 702 Hamilton Hall Workshop Organizers: Lydia Goehr (Columbia) & Gregg Horowitz (Pratt Institute)
Scientific Philosophy from Kant to Kuhn and Beyond – Michael Friedman (Stanford) 6:15 pm
Scientific Philosophy from Kant to Kuhn and Beyond – Michael Friedman (Stanford) @ NYU Law School, Lipton Hall
Mar 23 @ 6:15 pm – 8:15 pm
Abstract: These lectures report on my recent work in tracing out a path through a variety of philosophical attempts to appropriate developments in contemporaneous science on behalf of an evolving conception of “scientific” philosophy beginning with Kant and extending to the present.  I concentrate, in particular, on Kant and the post-Kantian tradition.  This includes the Naturphilosophie of Schelling and Hegel, the neo-Kantian reaction to Naturphilosophie initiated by Helmholtz, and the ensuing contributions to nineteenth and early twentieth century philosophy and science by Mach, Poincaré, and Einstein.  I then consider the neo-Kantianism of Ernst Cassirer and (yes) Thomas Kuhn, which finally leads to my own attempt to develop a post-Kuhnian approach to …

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Columbia-NYU Philosophy Grad Conference
Columbia-NYU Philosophy Grad Conference @ 310 Fayerweather Hall, Columbia U
Mar 24 all-day
The 18th Annual Columbia-NYU Graduate Conference in Philosophy The graduate students and faculty of the Columbia and NYU Philosophy Departments invite graduate submissions in any area of philosophy for a conference to be held on Saturday, March 24th, 2018 at Columbia University. Keynote Speaker: Richard Moran Brian D. Young Professor of Philosophy, Harvard University Submission Guidelines Submissions Deadline: Please make your submissions by following the instructions provided at ColumbiaNYU.wordpress.com by December 17th, 2017 (Notification by February 1st, 2018).  Papers must meet the following requirements: All papers must be between 3,000 and 5,000 words in length, suitable for a presentation of 30-40 minutes to a general philosophical audience. Submit papers with …

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Lying, Deception, Pretense, and Noncooperative Communication
Lying, Deception, Pretense, and Noncooperative Communication @ Columbia University 453 Mudd (Computer Science Department)
Mar 24 all-day
Workshop on Lying, Deception, Pretense, and Noncooperative Communication Saturday, March 24th 453 Mudd (Computer Science Department) Workshop Organizers: Una Stojnic (Columbia, Philosophy) & Julia Hirschberg (Columbia, Computer Science)
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Logic & Metaphysics Workshop 4:15 pm
Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 3309
Mar 26 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
Feb 26 Martin Pleitz, Muenster Mar 5 Vera Flocke, NYU Mar 12 Roy Sorensen, WUSTL Mar 19 Alex Citkin, Private Researcher Mar 26 Chris Scambler, NYU Apr 2 SPRING RECESS. NO MEETING Apr 9 Greg Restall, Melbourne Apr 16 Daniel Nolan, Notre Dame Apr 23 Mel Fitting, CUNY Apr 30 Sungil Han, Seoul National May 7 Andreas Ditter, NYU May14 Rohit Parikh
Mathematical Truth is Historically Contingent – Chris Scambler (NYU) 4:15 pm
Mathematical Truth is Historically Contingent – Chris Scambler (NYU) @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 3309
Mar 26 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
In this talk I will defend a view according to which certain mathematical facts depend counterfactually on certain historical facts. Specifically, I will sketch an alternative possible history for us in which (I claim) the proposition ordinarily expressed by the English sentence “there is a universal set” is true, despite its falsity in the actual world. Logic & Metaphysics Workshop Feb 26 Martin Pleitz, Muenster Mar 5 Vera Flocke, NYU Mar 12 Roy Sorensen, WUSTL Mar 19 Alex Citkin, Private Researcher Mar 26 Chris Scambler, NYU Apr 2 SPRING RECESS. NO MEETING Apr 9 Greg Restall, Melbourne Apr 16 Daniel Nolan, Notre Dame Apr 23 Mel Fitting, CUNY Apr 30 …

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Philosophy of Language Workshop 6:30 pm
Philosophy of Language Workshop @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 302
Mar 26 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
29 January Gillian Russell (UNC) 5 February Mandy Simons (CMU) 12 February (No Workshop) 19 February (No Workshop) 26 February Daniel Rothschild (UCL) 5 March Chris Kennedy (UChicago) 12 March Rachel Sterken (Oslo) 19 March No Workshop (NYU Spring Break) 26 March Andreas Stokke (Uppsala) 2 April Rebekah Baglini (Stanford) 9 April Henry Schiller (UT Austin) 16 April Gary Ostertag (CUNY) 23 April Manuel Križ (Jean Nicod) 30 April Maria Aloni (ILLC/Amsterdam) 7 May Alexis Wellwood (USC)
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Naturalized Aesthetics of Film Workshop 2:00 pm
Naturalized Aesthetics of Film Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 5307
Mar 27 @ 2:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Two CUNY Philosophy professors (Noël Carroll and Jesse Prinz) will present research alongside PhD student Zoe Cunliffe and alumna Laura Di Summa-Knoop in the upcoming Workshop on “Naturalized Aesthetics of Film”, taking place March 27th from 2-6pm in GC Room 5307. Additional presenters include Joerg Fingerhut (postdoc, Berlin School of Mind and Brain) and Murray Smith (University of Kent). The workshop celebrates Smith’s new monograph Film, Art, and the Third Culture, which defends an interdisciplinary approach to film studies. See the poster below for additional details (including the workshop schedule). Click here to download it as a PDF.
Mind and Language Research Seminar 4:00 pm
Mind and Language Research Seminar @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Mar 27 @ 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our topic for Spring 2018 will be Formal Frameworks for Semantics and Pragmatics. We’ll be investigating a range of questions in semantics and/or pragmatics which involve or are relevant to the choice between different kinds of overall structure for theories in these areas. In most sessions, the members of the seminar will receive a week in advance, copies of recent work, or work in progress from a thinker at another university. After reading this work, students discuss it with one of the instructors on the day before the colloquium. Then at the Tuesday colloquium, the instructors give a summary review and raise criticisms or questions about the work. The author …

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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Mar 28 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. February 7th • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture David Papineau (CUNY Graduate Center | King’s College London) “Kinds and Essences: Taming Metaphysical Modality” February 14th Jane Friedman (NYU) “The Epistemic and the Zetetic” February 21st Muhammad Ali Khalidi (York U) “Are Sexes Natural Kinds?” February 28th Laurie Paul (UNC) “De Se Truth and Epistemic Revolution” March 7th • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture Steven Lukes (NYU) Title TBD March 14th Collin O’Neill (CUNY Lehman College) “Consent and Third-Party Coercion in Medicine and Research” March 21st Edouard Machery (Pittsburgh) TBD …

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Scientific Philosophy from Kant to Kuhn and Beyond – Michael Friedman (Stanford) 6:15 pm
Scientific Philosophy from Kant to Kuhn and Beyond – Michael Friedman (Stanford) @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Mar 28 @ 6:15 pm – 8:15 pm
Abstract: These lectures report on my recent work in tracing out a path through a variety of philosophical attempts to appropriate developments in contemporaneous science on behalf of an evolving conception of “scientific” philosophy beginning with Kant and extending to the present.  I concentrate, in particular, on Kant and the post-Kantian tradition.  This includes the Naturphilosophie of Schelling and Hegel, the neo-Kantian reaction to Naturphilosophie initiated by Helmholtz, and the ensuing contributions to nineteenth and early twentieth century philosophy and science by Mach, Poincaré, and Einstein.  I then consider the neo-Kantianism of Ernst Cassirer and (yes) Thomas Kuhn, which finally leads to my own attempt to develop a post-Kuhnian approach to …

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Boethius’ “The Consolation of Philosophy” – Books 4 & 5 7:00 pm
Boethius’ “The Consolation of Philosophy” – Books 4 & 5 @ Elizabeth's apartment
Mar 29 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Brooklyn Philosophy Reading and Discussion Group Thursday, March 29 at 7:00 PM We’ll finish our discussion of this text which follows Philosophy’s treatment of Boethius walking him through questions of his life’s meaning and valu… https://www.meetup.com/Brooklyn-Philosophy-Reading-and-Discussion-Group/events/247534603/
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Miri Albahari (Univ. of Western Australia) 3:30 am
Miri Albahari (Univ. of Western Australia) @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Mar 30 @ 3:30 am – 5:30 am
Talk title and abstract forthcoming. Reception to follow in 6th floor lounge.
Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy 5:30 pm
Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy @ Columbia Religion Dept. rm 101
Mar 30 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
The Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy (CSCP) is a University Seminar dedicated to the advancement of projects that draw on both western and non-western philosophy. The CSCP meets monthly on the campus of Columbia University and occasionally hosts conferences. Please save the following dates for our upcoming talks: March 30: Kin Cheung (Moravian College) April 13: Lara Braitstein (McGill University) May 11: David Cummiskey (Bates College)
Buddhist Theories of Truth, Truth-Telling, and Lies – Kin Cheung (Moravian College) 6:30 pm
Buddhist Theories of Truth, Truth-Telling, and Lies – Kin Cheung (Moravian College) @ Columbia Religion Dept. rm 101
Mar 30 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Contrary to Damien Keown (2001), who worries that metaphysical and epistemological inquiry may distract from ethical investigation, Bronwyn Finnigan and Koji Tanaka (2008) argue such questions may provide grounding for practical application of a Buddhist ethical path. I follow this line of inquiry into Buddhist theories of truth in order to better understand right speech as conceived in the Early Buddhist Suttas. I focus on what the Abhaya Sutta explicitly instructs and what it leaves out regarding the types of words the Tathagata does not say or has a sense of the proper time for saying them. K. N. Jayatilleke (1963) and Mark Siderits (1979) provide convincing evidence that contrary to popular …

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Nietzsche + Visual Art 7:00 pm
Nietzsche + Visual Art @ Karahan's Loft
Mar 31 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Discussion with Seth Binsted, Michael Steinmann, and Yunus Tuncel. If you like to attend, Please RSVP by sending email to Luke Trusso at trussol@nietzschecircle.com