Calendar

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Mind and Language Research Seminar 4:00 pm
Mind and Language Research Seminar @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
May 1 @ 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our topic for Spring 2018 will be Formal Frameworks for Semantics and Pragmatics. We’ll be investigating a range of questions in semantics and/or pragmatics which involve or are relevant to the choice between different kinds of overall structure for theories in these areas. In most sessions, the members of the seminar will receive a week in advance, copies of recent work, or work in progress from a thinker at another university. After reading this work, students discuss it with one of the instructors on the day before the colloquium. Then at the Tuesday colloquium, the instructors give a summary review and raise criticisms or questions about the work. The author …

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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
May 2 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. February 7th • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture David Papineau (CUNY Graduate Center | King’s College London) “Kinds and Essences: Taming Metaphysical Modality” February 14th Jane Friedman (NYU) “The Epistemic and the Zetetic” February 21st Muhammad Ali Khalidi (York U) “Are Sexes Natural Kinds?” February 28th Laurie Paul (UNC) “De Se Truth and Epistemic Revolution” March 7th • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture Steven Lukes (NYU) Title TBD March 14th Collin O’Neill (CUNY Lehman College) “Consent and Third-Party Coercion in Medicine and Research” March 21st Edouard Machery (Pittsburgh) TBD …

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What is Creativity? A conversation between Professors Elliot Paul and Joan Snitzer 6:30 pm
What is Creativity? A conversation between Professors Elliot Paul and Joan Snitzer @ Sulzberger Parlor, 3rd Floor Barnard Hall
May 3 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Elliot Paul, assistant professor of philosophy, and Joan Snitzer, cochair and director of visual arts in the Department of Art History, come together to discuss the relationship between creative expression and appreciation in this installment of From the Faculty Lounge. Paul and Snitzer will explore creativity’s role in our happiness and moral choices, and how an artist’s ownership of their creativity compares to an audience’s influence. Moderated by Provost Linda Bell Space is limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Please arrive early as this event will be filmed and doors will close promptly at 6:30 PM. From the Faculty Lounge What is Creativity? Thursday, May 3, 2018 6:30 …

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Hannah Arendt’s “On Violence” 7:00 pm
Hannah Arendt’s “On Violence” @ Outpost Cafe
May 3 @ 7:00 pm – 9:30 pm
Brooklyn Philosophy Reading and Discussion Group Thursday, May 3 at 7:00 PM Join us this week as we discuss Hannah Arendt’s essay “On Violence”. A link to the text can be found here:… https://www.meetup.com/Brooklyn-Philosophy-Reading-and-Discussion-Group/events/249373060/
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Eastern Study Group of the North American Kant Society
Eastern Study Group of the North American Kant Society @ Columbia University Philosophy Dept. 716
May 4 – May 5 all-day
The Eastern Study Group of the NAKS invites submissions for its 15th annual meeting to take place at Columbia University on Friday and Saturday, May 4–5, 2018. Our host this year is Professor Patricia Kitcher. Conference Flyer Keynote Speakers: Stephen Engstrom (Pitt) Paul Guyer (Brown) Submissions of detailed abstracts (1,000 words) or papers (no more than 5,000 words, including notes and references) should be prepared for blind review as PDF files. Please include a word count at the end of your abstract or paper. Please supply contact information in a separate file. If you are a graduate student, please indicate this in your contact information. The selection committee welcomes contributions …

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Psychologism and Behaviourism Revisited – Tim Crane (CEU) 12:30 pm
Psychologism and Behaviourism Revisited – Tim Crane (CEU) @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
May 4 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm
Gottlob Frege famously argued that we should always ‘always separate sharply the psychological from the logical, the subjective from the objective’. While analytic philosophers have generally followed this advice when discussing logic and mathematics (in their rejection of ‘psychologism’ about these things), they have not followed it when discussing the psychological itself. It might be thought that if psychologism was true of anything, it is true of the psychological. But much 20th and 21st century analytic philosophy of mind has thought otherwise, approaching the study of the mind using ideas from logic, semantics and the theory of meaning (e.g. the proposition, truth, reference etc.). In this lecture I make two …

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David Barack (Columbia) 1:00 pm
David Barack (Columbia) @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 7113
May 4 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
“Reasoning often involves searching for information relevant to answering some question or determining the truth value of some proposition. Starting from a set of propositions, akin to a patch of resources in the environment, reasoners draw inferences, akin to harvesting resources from that patch. Reasoners forage through the space of propositions to find potentially informative patches, each of which promises multiple paths of inferences. Once reasoning from a premise patch begins, reasoners follow a path of inferences relevant to the reasoner’s goal. While foraging along these inferential paths, information relevant to the question or proposition is gathered from the premises. By interpreting reasoning in terms of information intake, a novel model of …

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Logic & Metaphysics Workshop 4:15 pm
Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 3309
May 7 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
Feb 26 Martin Pleitz, Muenster Mar 5 Vera Flocke, NYU Mar 12 Roy Sorensen, WUSTL Mar 19 Alex Citkin, Private Researcher Mar 26 Chris Scambler, NYU Apr 2 SPRING RECESS. NO MEETING Apr 9 Greg Restall, Melbourne Apr 16 Daniel Nolan, Notre Dame Apr 23 Mel Fitting, CUNY Apr 30 Sungil Han, Seoul National May 7 Andreas Ditter, NYU May14 Rohit Parikh
The Reduction of Necessity to Essence – Andreas Ditter (NYU) 4:15 pm
The Reduction of Necessity to Essence – Andreas Ditter (NYU) @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 3309
May 7 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
In ‘Essence and Modality’, Kit Fine proposes that for a proposition to be metaphysically necessary is for it to be true in virtue of the nature of all objects whatsoever. Call this view ‘Fine’s Thesis’. On its intended interpretation, the view takes for granted a notion of essence that is not analyzable in terms of metaphysical necessity. It can thus be understood as an analysis of metaphysical necessity in terms of an independently understood notion of essence. In this talk, I examine Fine’s Thesis in the context of Fine’s logic of essence (LE). I consider different ways in which the view might be developed, investigate their philosophical tenability and make …

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Philosophy of Language Workshop 6:30 pm
Philosophy of Language Workshop @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 302
May 7 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
29 January Gillian Russell (UNC) 5 February Mandy Simons (CMU) 12 February (No Workshop) 19 February (No Workshop) 26 February Daniel Rothschild (UCL) 5 March Chris Kennedy (UChicago) 12 March Rachel Sterken (Oslo) 19 March No Workshop (NYU Spring Break) 26 March Andreas Stokke (Uppsala) 2 April Rebekah Baglini (Stanford) 9 April Henry Schiller (UT Austin) 16 April Gary Ostertag (CUNY) 23 April Manuel Križ (Jean Nicod) 30 April Maria Aloni (ILLC/Amsterdam) 7 May Alexis Wellwood (USC)
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Minorities and Philosophy Spring Workshop Series 7:00 pm
Minorities and Philosophy Spring Workshop Series @ Various Locations around NYC
May 8 @ 7:00 pm – 9:30 pm
The Minorities and Philosophy (MAP) Chapters of Columbia, The New School, Rutgers, CUNY, NYU, and Princeton invite submissions from graduate students and postdoctoral fellows from underrepresented groups for a workshop series (NY-MAPWorks) in spring 2018. Dates: Jan 30th (NYU), Feb. 20th (New School), March 6th (CUNY), April 17th (Columbia), May 8th (NYU), 7-9:30pm. Submission Guidelines: To apply, please compete the following by December 15th, 2017: Send an extended abstract of 750-1,000 words (.pdf or .doc), prepared for blind review, suitable for a 25-30 minute presentation to a general philosophical audience to nymapshop@gmail.com. Provide your contact information by completing this google form. Applications will only be accepted from individuals from groups …

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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
May 9 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. February 7th • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture David Papineau (CUNY Graduate Center | King’s College London) “Kinds and Essences: Taming Metaphysical Modality” February 14th Jane Friedman (NYU) “The Epistemic and the Zetetic” February 21st Muhammad Ali Khalidi (York U) “Are Sexes Natural Kinds?” February 28th Laurie Paul (UNC) “De Se Truth and Epistemic Revolution” March 7th • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture Steven Lukes (NYU) Title TBD March 14th Collin O’Neill (CUNY Lehman College) “Consent and Third-Party Coercion in Medicine and Research” March 21st Edouard Machery (Pittsburgh) TBD …

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Susan Sontag’s “Regarding the Pain of Others” 7:00 pm
Susan Sontag’s “Regarding the Pain of Others” @ Outpost Cafe
May 10 @ 7:00 pm – 9:30 pm
Brooklyn Philosophy Reading and Discussion Group Thursday, May 10 at 7:00 PM This week we’ll discuss Susan Sontag’s short book about the meaning and effects of absorbing media depicting violence and suffering. A link to the wor… https://www.meetup.com/Brooklyn-Philosophy-Reading-and-Discussion-Group/events/249373103/
Himpathy for the Nice Guy – Kate Mann (Cornell) 7:30 pm
Himpathy for the Nice Guy – Kate Mann (Cornell) @ Brooklyn Public Library
May 10 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
It’s the last Brooklyn Public Philosophers talk of the season! Tomorrow, Thursday May 10th, Kate Manne (Cornell) is coming to the Brooklyn Public Library to discuss her work on misogyny, sexism, the difference between the two, and the weird amount of sympathy that society grants to perpetrators of sexual violence. If you’re interested in #MeToo, excuses, and how to manage one another’s feelings about assaults on patriarchy, this is for you. In her recent book, Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny (Oxford University Press: 2017), Kate Manne characterizes misogyny as the “law enforcement” branch of patriarchy, which serves to police, enforce, or restore patriarchal social order—often by visiting hostility on …

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Buddhist Perfectionism and Kantian Liberalism on Self-Constitution – David Cummiskey (Bates College) 5:30 pm
Buddhist Perfectionism and Kantian Liberalism on Self-Constitution – David Cummiskey (Bates College) @ Columbia Religion Dept. rm 101
May 11 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
At the core of Kantian liberalism is a conception of the independent autonomous subject. On the other hand, the most central and distinguishing feature of Buddhist philosophy is the doctrine of no-self. It thus seems that Buddhists should reject Kantian liberalism. My larger project develops the connections between Buddhist perfectionism, liberalism, and principles of justice. In this paper, I focus on Buddhist and Kantian conceptions of self-constitution, but my ultimate concern is the significance of the doctrine of no-self to theories of justice. Buddhists need some conception of a minimal self to account for the karmic-continuity of persons and also to provide an adequate account of the subjectivity of experience. …

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To What Extent is a Group an Individual? (Rohit Parikh) 4:15 pm
To What Extent is a Group an Individual? (Rohit Parikh) @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 3309
May 14 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
Dennett in his Darwin’s Dangerous Idea (1995) and Kinds of Minds (1996) discusses an evolutionary hierarchy of intellectual progress. He calls the hierarchy the ‘Tower of Generate-and-Test,’ where there are five kinds of creatures.  These range from  ‘Darwinian creatures,’ organisms which are blindly generated and field-tested, to Popperian creatures which can make plans,  to creatures like human beings who use ‘language’ to communicate with others like them. One could ask, “at what level, if any, do groups belong” if indeed we can regard them as individuals or as intentional beings?  Since they do use language, one would think, they are creatures of this last level.  But difficulties arise in thinking …

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A Lawyer, A Poet, and A Philosopher walk into a bar to talk about American Misery 6:00 pm
A Lawyer, A Poet, and A Philosopher walk into a bar to talk about American Misery @ Cornelia Street Cafe
May 15 @ 6:00 pm
Are you miserable? If you are, you certainly have company. Misery has been on the rise in our society for some time, and the suffering is widespread: we, the people, feel lonely, neglected, forgotten, increasingly poor in health, in habit, and in purchasing power. A sense of helplessness shrouds the land. The manifestations of this are grim. Some take the agony of their despair and direct it outward, destroying the lives of concert attendees, night club patrons, students, and those who have the temerity or misfortune to set foot on the wrong side of the street. Others take aim at themselves, opting to end their lives either swiftly by the …

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Philosophy of Science Workshop
Philosophy of Science Workshop @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 302
May 16 all-day
J. Brian Pitts (Cambridge). 11am-12pm, Wednesday May 16, NYU philosophy department, room 302 (5 Washington Place, New York, NY). Title: TBD. Abstract: TBD. =============================================================== Jeremy Butterfield (Cambridge). 1:30-3:30pm, Wednesday May 16, NYU philosophy department, room 302 (5 Washington Place, New York, NY). Title: On Dualities and Equivalences Between Physical Theories. Abstract: My main aim is to make a remark about the relation between (i) dualities between theories, as `duality’ is understood in physics and (ii) equivalence of theories, as `equivalence’ is understood in logic and philosophy. The remark is that in physics, two theories can be dual, and accordingly get called `the same theory’, though we interpret them as disagreeing—so …

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Rutgers-Columbia Workshop on Metaphysics of Science: Quantum Field Theories*
Rutgers-Columbia Workshop on Metaphysics of Science: Quantum Field Theories* @ Rutgers Philosophy Dept
May 17 – May 18 all-day
Workshop Theme: What is the metaphysical status of quantum field theory (QFT)? How should field theories be interpreted? These questions have received considerable attention over the past few decades in various research projects in physics, mathematics, and philosophy, but there is no clear consensus on any of them. One finds a variety of different approaches to understanding QFTs — Algebraic QFT, conventional QFT, Bell-type Bohmian QFT, etc. — and different interpretations — realism, instrumentalism, and structuralism. What are the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches? What is the status of the measurement problem in these theories? And more generally, how should QFT inform the metaphysics of science? The two-day Rutgers …

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Metaphysical Mayhem
Metaphysical Mayhem @ Rutgers Philosophy Dept. 5th floor Seminar Rm.
May 21 – May 25 all-day
The Department’s colloquium series typically meets on Thursdays in the Seminar Room at Gateway Bldg, 106 Somerset Street, 5th Floor. 2/27/18 Goldman Lecture, 4pm 3/1/18 Mesthene Lecture, Prof. Miranda Fricker (GC-CUNY), 3:00-6:30 pm 3/22/18 RU Climate Lecture, Prof. Sally Haslanger (MIT) 3:00-5:00 pm 4/8/18 Karen Bennett (Cornell University) 4/12/18 Sanders Lecture, Prof. Linda Zagzebski (University of Oklahoma) 4/13/18 Rutgers Chinese Philosophy Conference, 9:30 am-6:30 pm 4/13-4/14/18 Marilyn McCord Adams Memorial Conference 4/14-4/15/18 Rutgers-Columbia Undergraduate Philosophy Conference (held at Columbia University) 4/17/18 Class of 1970’s Lecture, Prof. Jeremy Waldron (NYU), Alexander Teleconference Lecture Hall, 4:30-7:30 pm 5/21-5/25/18 Metaphysical Mayhem 6/8-6/9/18 Pantheism Workshop 7/8-7/15/18 Summer Institute for Diversity in Philosophy (held at …

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Working Papers in Ethics and Moral Psychology 5:30 pm
Working Papers in Ethics and Moral Psychology @ Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Anneberg 12-15
May 24 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Working Papers in Ethics and Moral Psychology is a speaker series conducted under the auspices of the Icahn School of Medicine Bioethics Program. It is a working group where speakers are invited to present well-developed, as yet unpublished work. The focus of the group is interdisciplinary, with an emphasis on topics in ethics, bioethics, neuroethics, and moral psychology. The meetings begin with a brief presentation by the invited speaker and the remaining time is devoted to a discussion of the paper. The speakers will make their papers available in advance of their presentation to those who sign up for the Working Papers mailing list. All speakers: 9/28/2017: Eric Chwang /Rutgers …

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A Lawyer, A Poet, and A Philosopher walk into a bar to talk about American Misery 8:00 pm
A Lawyer, A Poet, and A Philosopher walk into a bar to talk about American Misery @ Las Tapas Bar and Restaurant
May 24 @ 8:00 pm
Are you miserable? If you are, you certainly have company. Misery has been on the rise in our society for some time, and the suffering is widespread: we, the people, feel lonely, neglected, forgotten, increasingly poor in health, in habit, and in purchasing power. A sense of helplessness shrouds the land. The manifestations of this are grim. Some take the agony of their despair and direct it outward, destroying the lives of concert attendees, night club patrons, students, and those who have the temerity or misfortune to set foot on the wrong side of the street. Others take aim at themselves, opting to end their lives either swiftly by the …

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Philosophy of Psychology Workshop 1:00 pm
Philosophy of Psychology Workshop @ Columbia University Philosophy Dept. 716
May 25 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
PoPRocks (formerly known as ‘WoPoP’) is an ongoing series in the NYC area for early career researchers – typically grad students and postdocs – working on philosophy of psychology/mind/perception/cognitive science/neuroscience/… . We usually meet roughly once every 2 weeks to informally discuss a draft paper by one of our members. Typically presenters send a copy of their paper around 1 week in advance, so do join the mailing list (by emailing poprocksworkshop@gmail.com or one of the organizers) or email to ask for a copy of the paper. We aim for a friendly, constructive discussion with the understanding that the drafts discussed are typically work in progress. Summer Program: Friday May …

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Philosophy of Psychology Workshop – Stephan Pohl 1:00 pm
Philosophy of Psychology Workshop – Stephan Pohl @ Columbia University Philosophy Dept. 716
May 25 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
In perception, the world is represented by me. So goes a very naive thesis about perception. Yet when faced with phenomena of hallucination and illusion many theorists come to accept that in perception one merely represents a possible world that can more or less accurately match the actual world. Recently, a much more radical thesis arose: Perception is probabilistic. This would mean that in perception one does not simply represent one possible world, but one represents multiple possible worlds at the same time each to a certain degree. Should we come to accept this preposterous claim? I argue for the conservative position that perception is not probabilistic. We do find …

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Legal Philosophy Workshop 2018
Legal Philosophy Workshop 2018 @ Rutgers Philosophy Dept
May 31 – Jun 1 all-day
LPW is an annual conference designed to foster reflection on the nature of law and the philosophical issues underlying its different areas. Our aim is to promote work that connects legal philosophy with other branches of philosophy (e.g., moral and political philosophy, metaphysics, philosophy of language, epistemology, or philosophy of action) and to create a venue for the critical examination of different viewpoints about law. The format of the workshop is pre-read. Each session will start with a very short presentation by the author (5-10 minutes). A commentator will then kick off the discussion; the author will respond to the comments, and then the remainder of the session will be dedicated to Q&A. We are inviting abstracts …

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Benedict de Spinoza’s “Ethics”- Part 1 7:00 pm
Benedict de Spinoza’s “Ethics”- Part 1 @ Outpost Cafe
May 31 @ 7:00 pm – 9:30 pm
Brooklyn Philosophy Reading and Discussion Group Thursday, May 31 at 7:00 PM This week we will discuss together our close reading of Part 1 of Spinoza’s “Ethics”, Concerning God. We will work our way through the text assuring t… https://www.meetup.com/Brooklyn-Philosophy-Reading-and-Discussion-Group/events/249373199/