Calendar

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
Ask A Philosopher Booth 12:00 pm
Ask A Philosopher Booth @ Turnstyle Underground Market at Columbus Circle
Mar 1 @ 12:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Come, ask a philosopher what you will, or just discuss big ideas with your fellow New Yorkers!
Cognitive Science Speaker Series 1:00 pm
Cognitive Science Speaker Series @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 7102
Mar 1 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Spring 2019 2/15: Andrew Lee, Philosophy, New York University 2/22: William Robinson, Philosophy, Iowa State University 3/1: Wesley Sauret, Philosophy, University of Bayreuth 3/8: Jean-Paul Noel, Center for Neural Science, New York University 3/15: Santiago Echeverri, Philosophy, New York University 3/22: TBA 3/29: TBA 4/5: No Cognitive Science talk: CUNY Graduate-Student Conference https://2019cunyphilosophyconference.weebly.com/ 4/12: TBA 4/19, 4/26: No talks; Spring Break 5/3: TBA Additional information at: http://bit.ly/cscitalks or e-mail David Rosenthal <davidrosenthal1@gmail.com>
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NYC Workshop in Early Modern Philosophy: Freedom and Evil
NYC Workshop in Early Modern Philosophy: Freedom and Evil @ Fordham Lincoln Center
Mar 2 – Mar 3 all-day
The workshop, which is now in its 9th year, aims to foster exchange and collaboration among scholars, students, and anyone with an interest in Early Modern Philosophy. This year’s workshop will focus on the topic of “Freedom and Evil” in Early Modern Philosophy (roughly the period from 1600-1800). We welcome submissions on the conference topic, which may be broadly construed to include the problem of free will, theodicy, political and social liberty, and evil practices and institutions. For consideration, please submit abstracts of 250-300 words to newyorkcityearlymodern@gmail.com no later than December 31, 2018. Keynote speakers: Robert Adams (unaffiliated) Aaron Garrett Boston University Organisers: Lauren Kopajtic (unaffiliated) Ohad Nachtomy Bar-Ilan University, …

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CANCELLED – Coverage-Reliance Ignorance, Eric Bayruns Garcia (CUNY) – Logic & Metaphysics Workshop 4:15 pm
CANCELLED – Coverage-Reliance Ignorance, Eric Bayruns Garcia (CUNY) – Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, 7314
Mar 4 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
Meeting Cancellation: The CUNY Graduate Center will be closed on Monday, March 4th. Therefore, the Logic and Metaphysics Workshop will not be meeting. There is no meeting I argue that racial injustice can make a subject’s news sources unreliable because of the effect of (1) racial prejudice and (2) society’s unjust structure on the news-gathering-and-disseminating processes a subject relies on.  I assume that societies with entrenched racial injustice have widespread racial prejudices and that these societies are unjustly structured.  I argue that racial injustice can undermine a subject’s capacity to be properly sensitive to her social conditions such that she is doxastically justified in her coverage-supported belief. In section one, I …

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Logic & Metaphysics Workshop 4:15 pm
Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, 7314
Mar 4 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
The Logic and Metaphysics Workshop will be meeting on Mondays from 4:15 to 6:15 in room 7314 of the Graduate Center, CUNY (365 5th Avenue). The (provisional) schedule is as follows: Feb 4. Melvin Fitting, CUNY Feb 11. Benjamin Neeser, Geneva Feb 18. GC CLOSED. NO MEETING Feb 25. Achille Varzi, Columbia Mar 4. Eric Bayruns Garcia, CUNY Mar 11. Jeremy Goodman, USC Mar 18. Romina Padro, CUNY Mar 25. Kit Fine, NYU Apr 1. Elena Ficara, Paderborn Apr 8. Chris Scambler, NYU Apr 15.  Jenn McDonald, CUNY Apr 22. GC CLOSED. NO MEETING Apr 29. Tommy Kivatinos, CUNY May 6. Daniel Durante, Natal May 13. Martina Botti, Columbia May 20. …

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Philosophy of Language Workshop 6:30 pm
Philosophy of Language Workshop @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 302
Mar 4 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
We’re a community of philosophers of language centered in New York City. We have a meeting each week at which a speaker presents a piece of their own work relating to the philosophy of language. 28 January Luca Incurvati (ILLC/Amsterdam) 4 February Dan Hoek (NYU) 11 February Peter Klecha (Swarthmore) 25 February Ginger Schultheis (NYU/Chicago) and David Boylan (Rutgers) 4 March Chris Tancredi (Keio University, Tokyo) 11 March TBD 25 March Yael Sharvit (UCLA) 1 April Thony Gillies (Rutgers) 8 April Yale Weiss (CUNY) 15 April Friederike Moltmann (CNRS) 22 April Amir Anvari (Institut Jean Nicod, ENS) 29 April David Balcarras (MIT) 6 May Nadine Theiler (ILLC, Amsterdam) 13 May …

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Jason D’Cruz (University at Albany, SUNY) 4:30 pm
Jason D’Cruz (University at Albany, SUNY) @ Rose Hill Campus
Mar 5 @ 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm
Jason D’Cruz (University at Albany, SUNY) Location: TBD Rose Hill Campus
Typicality of Worlds and the Metaphysics of Laws. Dustin Lazarovici (UNIL) 4:30 pm
Typicality of Worlds and the Metaphysics of Laws. Dustin Lazarovici (UNIL) @ NYU, room 110
Mar 5 @ 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm
What are laws of nature? The predominant view in contemporary philosophy of science is the Humean `best system account’ which holds that the laws of nature are merely descriptive, an efficient summary of contingent regularities that we find in the world. Using the concept of typicality, I will spell out a common anti-Humean intuition into a precise argument: A typical Humean world wouldn’t have any law-like regularities to begin with. Thus (I will argue), Humean metaphysics do not fit the objective order that we find in our universe. There will be dinner after the talk. If you are interested, please send an email with `Dinner’ in the heading to nyphilsci@gmail.com …

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Mind and Language Seminar 4:00 pm
Mind and Language Seminar @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Mar 6 @ 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our topic for Spring 2018 will be Formal Frameworks for Semantics and Pragmatics. We’ll be investigating a range of questions in semantics and/or pragmatics which involve or are relevant to the choice between different kinds of overall structure for theories in these areas. In most sessions, the members of the seminar will receive a week in advance, copies of recent work, or work in progress from a thinker at another university. After reading this work, students discuss it with one of the instructors on the day before the colloquium. Then at the Tuesday colloquium, the instructors give a summary review and raise criticisms or questions about the work. The author …

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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Mar 6 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. Download an interactive PDF version of the schedule here. February 6 • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture Ned Block (New York University) “Perception is Non-Propositional, Non-Conceptual and Iconic” February 13 Francesco Pupa (Nassau Community College) “Determiners are Phrases” February 20 Robert Rupert (University of Colorado, Boulder) “There Is No Personal Level: On the Virtues of a Psychology Flattened from Above” February 27 Reed Winegar (Fordham University) “Kant on Infinity” March 6 • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture David Schweickart (Loyola …

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On Frege’s Assimilation of Sentences with Names, Dongwoo Kim (CUNY) 4:30 pm
On Frege’s Assimilation of Sentences with Names, Dongwoo Kim (CUNY) @ CUNY Grad Center, 6495
Mar 7 @ 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm
I shall discuss some of the issues concerning a notorious doctrine of Frege that sentences are names of truth-values. I am interested in a problem raised by Kripke that the doctrine obscures the distinction between judgeable and unjudgeable contents. I shall present what I take to be Frege’s account of judgeable content. A proper expression of a judgeable content, for Frege, is susceptible to an analysis into a predicate and an argument-word, where a predicate is understood as a concept-word used to attribute a certain property to the referent of the argument-word. In the light of this analysis, I shall argue that the doctrine does not obscure the distinction. The …

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I, holobiont. Are you and your microbes a community or a single entity? – Derek Skillings 7:30 pm
I, holobiont. Are you and your microbes a community or a single entity? – Derek Skillings @ Dweck Center, Brooklyn Public Library
Mar 7 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
When we’re asked to give examples of philosophical questions, we’re likely to think of questions that are very, very old. Is the physical world all there is? How should I live? How do we know what we know? But some philosophical problems are quite new, made possible or urgent by new developments in science and culture. These are often the most exciting problems to think through. On March 7th at 7:30 PM, Derek Skillings joins Brooklyn Public Philosophers to share his work on the philosophical consequences of the fact that we are holobionts – biological units composed of hosts and their associated swarms of microorganisms. If you’re interested in health, …

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Gabriele Pulcini (New University of Lisbon): From Complementary Logic to Proof-Theoretic Semantics 12:00 pm
Gabriele Pulcini (New University of Lisbon): From Complementary Logic to Proof-Theoretic Semantics @ Columbia U Philosophy Dept. 716
Mar 8 @ 12:00 pm
Two proof-systems P and P* are said to be complementary when one proves exactly the non-theorems of the other. Complementary systems come as a particular kind of refutation calculi whose patterns of inference always work by inferring unprovable conclusions form unprovable premises. In the first part of my talk, I will focus on LK*, the sequent system complementing Gentzen’s system LK for classical logic. I will show, then, how to enrich LK* with two admissible (unary) cut rules, which allow for a simple and efficient cut-elimination algorithm. In particular, two facts will be highlighted: 1) for any given provable sequent, complementary cut-elimination always returns one of its simplest proofs, and …

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Cognitive Science Speaker Series 1:00 pm
Cognitive Science Speaker Series @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 7102
Mar 8 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Spring 2019 2/15: Andrew Lee, Philosophy, New York University 2/22: William Robinson, Philosophy, Iowa State University 3/1: Wesley Sauret, Philosophy, University of Bayreuth 3/8: Jean-Paul Noel, Center for Neural Science, New York University 3/15: Santiago Echeverri, Philosophy, New York University 3/22: TBA 3/29: TBA 4/5: No Cognitive Science talk: CUNY Graduate-Student Conference https://2019cunyphilosophyconference.weebly.com/ 4/12: TBA 4/19, 4/26: No talks; Spring Break 5/3: TBA Additional information at: http://bit.ly/cscitalks or e-mail David Rosenthal <davidrosenthal1@gmail.com>
Body and Mind in Early China: Embodied Cognition, Digital Humanities, and the Project of Comparative Philosophy- Edward Slingerland (University of British Columbia) 5:30 pm
Body and Mind in Early China: Embodied Cognition, Digital Humanities, and the Project of Comparative Philosophy- Edward Slingerland (University of British Columbia) @ Columbia University Religion Dept. 101
Mar 8 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
It is commonly claimed that mind-body dualism is entirely foreign to China—or “the East” more generally. This talk will explore how engaging with the cognitive sciences and digital humanities undermines claims such as this, and more broadly can help us to do our work as scholars of comparative philosophy. Embracing an embodied view of human cognition gets us beyond strong social constructivism and its accompanying cultural essentialism. In addition, new tools from the science and digital humanities can, in combination with traditional archaeological and textual evidence, allow us to more accurately and rigorously assess claims about the philosophical and religious historical record. Specifically, I will focus on novel large-scale textual …

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Meeting 59: Berkeley and Idealism 2:00 pm
Meeting 59: Berkeley and Idealism @ Justine's apartment
Mar 10 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Philosophy-in-Manhattan Sunday, March 10 at 2:00 PM CUNY philosophy PhD candidate Liam Ryan will lead. Bishop George Berkeley is one the most original thinkers to grace philosophy. Considered one of the… Price: 14.00 USD https://www.meetup.com/Philosophy-in-Manhattan/events/257432871/
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Jeremy Goodman (USC): Deep Structure. Logic & Metaphysics Workshop 4:15 pm
Jeremy Goodman (USC): Deep Structure. Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, 7314
Mar 11 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
Russell proved over a century ago that a naive conception of structured propositions is inconsistent. Hodes (2015), Dorr (2016), and Goodman (2017) have recently reformulated Russell’s argument in the language of higher-order logic, and concluded from it that distinctions in reality cannot always reflect all the syntactic structure of the language in which we draw those distinctions. But they also float the idea that such distinctions might nevertheless have sentence-like structure, so long as this structure fails to neatly correspond to the syntactic structure of the sentences we use to draw those distinction. Perhaps, that is, the popular metaphor of facts being like sentences written in God’s “book of the …

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Philosophy of Language Workshop 6:30 pm
Philosophy of Language Workshop @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 302
Mar 11 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
We’re a community of philosophers of language centered in New York City. We have a meeting each week at which a speaker presents a piece of their own work relating to the philosophy of language. 28 January Luca Incurvati (ILLC/Amsterdam) 4 February Dan Hoek (NYU) 11 February Peter Klecha (Swarthmore) 25 February Ginger Schultheis (NYU/Chicago) and David Boylan (Rutgers) 4 March Chris Tancredi (Keio University, Tokyo) 11 March TBD 25 March Yael Sharvit (UCLA) 1 April Thony Gillies (Rutgers) 8 April Yale Weiss (CUNY) 15 April Friederike Moltmann (CNRS) 22 April Amir Anvari (Institut Jean Nicod, ENS) 29 April David Balcarras (MIT) 6 May Nadine Theiler (ILLC, Amsterdam) 13 May …

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Social and Political Philosophy Workshop 5:30 pm
Social and Political Philosophy Workshop @ Law School rm 8-01
Mar 12 @ 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm
Meetings are held on Tuesdays at Fordham’s Lincoln Center campus in Manhattan in the Plaza View Room, 12th Floor, Lowenstein Building (113 W. 60th St). We meet from 5:30 to 6:45 and papers are read in advance. If interested in attending, contact sahaddad@fordham.edu or jeflynn@fordham.edu. September 18 – Cristina Beltrán (NYU) October 9 – Jennifer Scuro (New Rochelle) – “Mapping Ableist Biases: Diagnoses and Prostheses” November 6 – Lillian Cicerchia (Fordham) March 12 – Rahel Jaeggi (Humboldt) April 9 – Ann Murphy (New Mexico), “Hunger on Campus: Continental Philosophy and Basic Needs” April 16 – Rahel Jaeggi (Humboldt/IAS), “Criticism and Its Discontents: A Defense of an Immanent Critique of Forms of Life” February 12 May 7 – Robin Celikates (Amsterdam/IAS), “Radical Civility? Civil …

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13
Mind and Language Seminar 4:00 pm
Mind and Language Seminar @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Mar 13 @ 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our topic for Spring 2018 will be Formal Frameworks for Semantics and Pragmatics. We’ll be investigating a range of questions in semantics and/or pragmatics which involve or are relevant to the choice between different kinds of overall structure for theories in these areas. In most sessions, the members of the seminar will receive a week in advance, copies of recent work, or work in progress from a thinker at another university. After reading this work, students discuss it with one of the instructors on the day before the colloquium. Then at the Tuesday colloquium, the instructors give a summary review and raise criticisms or questions about the work. The author …

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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Mar 13 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. Download an interactive PDF version of the schedule here. February 6 • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture Ned Block (New York University) “Perception is Non-Propositional, Non-Conceptual and Iconic” February 13 Francesco Pupa (Nassau Community College) “Determiners are Phrases” February 20 Robert Rupert (University of Colorado, Boulder) “There Is No Personal Level: On the Virtues of a Psychology Flattened from Above” February 27 Reed Winegar (Fordham University) “Kant on Infinity” March 6 • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture David Schweickart (Loyola …

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Why Read Hannah Arendt Now: Book Launch and Movie Screening 6:00 pm
Why Read Hannah Arendt Now: Book Launch and Movie Screening @ Wolff Conference Room, NSSR, D1103
Mar 13 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Vera List Professor of Philosophy, Richard J. Bernstein, will present his new book on Hannah Arendt, Why Read Hannah Arendt Now (2018, Polity Press), followed by a screening of the documentary film Vita Activa: The Spirit of Hannah Arendt. Free and open to the public.
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Rutgers Philosophy Dept. Colloquia 3:00 pm
Rutgers Philosophy Dept. Colloquia @ Seminar Room, Gateway Transit Building, 5th flr
Mar 14 @ 3:00 pm
The Department’s colloquium series typically meets on Thursdays in the Seminar Room at Gateway Transit Building, 106 Somerset Street, 5th Floor at 3:00 p.m. Please see the Department Calendar for scheduled speakers and more details. 01/31  Department Colloquium-Prof. Brian Epstein (Tufts) 02/07  Inclusive Pedagogy by Prof. Zoë Johnson-King (NYU) 02/28  Climate Lecture-Prof. Teresa Blankmeyer Burke (Gallaudet University) 03/14  Mesthene Lecture-Prof. Lara Buchak (UC Berkeley) 03/28  Break It Down Lecture-Prof. Paul Pietroski, “Human Languages: What are They?” 04/11  Class of 1970s Lecture: Prof. Gideon Rosen (Princeton) Alexander Teleconf. Lecture Hall, 4:30-7:30 pm 04/18  Break It Down Lecture-Prof. Larry Temkin, “Population Ethics: Forty Years On” 04/25 – 04/27 Semantics Workshop (Lepore) 04/27  Rutgers Day …

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Susanna Schellenberg (Rutgers) Capacities First 4:00 pm
Susanna Schellenberg (Rutgers) Capacities First @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 5307
Mar 14 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Despite their importance in the history of philosophy and in particular in the work of Aristotle and Kant, mental capacities have been neglected in recent philosophical work. By contrast, the notion of a capacity is deeply entrenched in psychology and the brain sciences. Driven by the idea that a cognitive system has the capacity it does in virtue of its internal components and their organization, it is standard to appeal to capacities in cognitive psychology. The main benefit of invoking capacities in an account of the mind is that it allows for an elegant counterfactual analysis of mental states: it allows us to analyze mental states on three distinct yet …

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Working Papers in Ethics and Moral Psychology 5:30 pm
Working Papers in Ethics and Moral Psychology @ Icahn School @Mount Sinai, Annenberg 12-16
Mar 14 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Working Papers in Ethics and Moral Psychology is a speaker series conducted under the auspices of the Icahn School of Medicine Bioethics Program. It is a working group where speakers are invited to present well-developed, as yet unpublished work. The focus of the group is interdisciplinary, with an emphasis on topics in ethics, bioethics, neuroethics, and moral psychology. The meetings begin with a brief presentation by the invited speaker and the remaining time is devoted to a discussion of the paper. The speakers will make their papers available in advance of their presentation to those who sign up for the Working Papers mailing list. Upcoming Speakers: 11 Oct: Jordan Mackenzie, …

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Andrea Long Chu “Females: A Concern “ 6:00 pm
Andrea Long Chu “Females: A Concern “ @ Wolff Conference Room, D1103
Mar 14 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
“Everyone is female”—this is the first of several “untenable claims” presented by Andrea Long Chu in her forthcoming book Females: A Concern (Verso, 2019). Drawing inspiration from Valerie Solanas’s SCUM Manifesto and her forgotten play Up Your Ass, this lecture in numbered theses whips through a variety of ugly objects (films, manifestos, performance art, psychoanalysis, porn, and the alt-right) to give a portrait of femaleness as a universal category of self-ablation against which all politics—even feminist politics—revolts. Andrea Long Chu is a writer and critic completing her doctorate at New York University. Her writing has appeared, or will soon, in n+1, Boston Review, The New York Times, New York, Artforum, Bookforum, Chronicle of Higher Education, 4Columns, differences, Women & Performance, TSQ, and Journal of Speculative Philosophy. Her …

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NYC Minorities and Philosophy Workshop 6:00 pm
NYC Minorities and Philosophy Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, rm tba
Mar 14 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
The Minorities and Philosophy (MAP) chapters of Columbia, NYU, Rutgers, and the Graduate Center, CUNY, invite submissions to the Spring 2019 NY-MAPWorks: a workshop series featuring the work of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows on topics in critical social philosophy and non-canonical areas of philosophy. Topics include, but are not limited to: social philosophy (including intersections with epistemology, language, and metaphysics), feminist philosophy and philosophy of sex and gender, philosophy of race, queer philosophy, non-western philosophy, africana philosophy, latinx philosophy, native american philosophy, and women in the history of philosophy. The Format The series will alternate locations in New York City (see below for the full list of dates and …

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Philosophy of Psychology Workshop 7:00 pm
Philosophy of Psychology Workshop @ 302 Philosophy Hall, Columbia U
Mar 14 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
PoPRocks (formerly known as ‘WoPoP’) is an ongoing series in the NYC area for early career researchers – typically grad students, postdocs, people who got their PhD within the last few years, advanced undergrads etc. – working on philosophy of psychology/mind/perception/cognitive science/neuroscience/… . We usually meet roughly once every 2-3 weeks to informally discuss a draft paper by one of our members. Typically presenters send a copy of their paper around 1 week in advance, so do join the mailing list (by emailing poprocksworkshop@gmail.com or one of the organizers) or email to ask for a copy of the paper. We aim for a friendly, constructive discussion with the understanding that …

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Perceptual Objectivity and Rational Agency -Amogh Sahu. Philosophy of Psychology Workshop 8:00 pm
Perceptual Objectivity and Rational Agency -Amogh Sahu. Philosophy of Psychology Workshop @ 302 Philosophy Hall, Columbia U
Mar 14 @ 8:00 pm
PoPRocks (formerly known as ‘WoPoP’) is an ongoing series in the NYC area for early career researchers – typically grad students, postdocs, people who got their PhD within the last few years, advanced undergrads etc. – working on philosophy of psychology/mind/perception/cognitive science/neuroscience/… . We usually meet roughly once every 2-3 weeks to informally discuss a draft paper by one of our members. Typically presenters send a copy of their paper around 1 week in advance, so do join the mailing list (by emailing poprocksworkshop@gmail.com or one of the organizers) or email to ask for a copy of the paper. We aim for a friendly, constructive discussion with the understanding that …

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Black Women Philosophers Conference
Black Women Philosophers Conference @ Elebash Recital Hall, CUNY Grad Center
Mar 15 – Mar 16 all-day
What does a philosopher look like? Inevitably, our mental pictures are shaped by the dominant imagery of the white male marble busts of Greco-Roman antiquity—Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Seneca—and their modern European heirs—Hobbes, Descartes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Mill. Even today Western philosophy is largely male and overwhelmingly white—about 97 percent in the U.S., close to 100 percent in Europe. Diversifying the field requires expanding our corporeal imaginary of its practitioners. This conference, timed to honor Professor Anita Allen-Castellitto (Penn), the first black female President in the 100-year-plus history of the American Philosophical Association, aims to showcase the work of a traditionally under-represented population, challenging these preconceptions. Allen and fifteen other …

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Brown Bag Series 12:00 pm
Brown Bag Series @ Philosophy Conference Room, Collins Hall, Room 139
Mar 15 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
A presentation of ongoing research by Fordham Philosophers; bring your own lunch, light refreshments will be provided. All meetings are from 12:00-1:00 pm in the Philosophy Department Conference Room in Collins Hall. Contact: Stephen Grimm Stephen Grimm – September 14, 2018 Andrew Jampol-Petzinger – October 26, 2018 Lauren Kopajtic – November 16, 2018 Nicholas Smyth – February 15, 2019 Brian Johnson – March 15, 2019 Crina Gschwandtner – April 5, 2019
Sue Weinberg Lecture in honor of the life and work of Eileen O’Neill 12:00 pm
Sue Weinberg Lecture in honor of the life and work of Eileen O’Neill @ CUNY Grad Center, rm tba
Mar 15 @ 12:00 pm
Save the date! March 15, 2019 Sue Weinberg Lecture in honor of the life and work of Eileen O’Neill. CUNY Graduate Center, room TBD
Cognitive Science Speaker Series 1:00 pm
Cognitive Science Speaker Series @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 7102
Mar 15 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Spring 2019 2/15: Andrew Lee, Philosophy, New York University 2/22: William Robinson, Philosophy, Iowa State University 3/1: Wesley Sauret, Philosophy, University of Bayreuth 3/8: Jean-Paul Noel, Center for Neural Science, New York University 3/15: Santiago Echeverri, Philosophy, New York University 3/22: TBA 3/29: TBA 4/5: No Cognitive Science talk: CUNY Graduate-Student Conference https://2019cunyphilosophyconference.weebly.com/ 4/12: TBA 4/19, 4/26: No talks; Spring Break 5/3: TBA Additional information at: http://bit.ly/cscitalks or e-mail David Rosenthal <davidrosenthal1@gmail.com>
“Why Care About What There Is” Daniel Korman (UCSB) 3:30 pm
“Why Care About What There Is” Daniel Korman (UCSB) @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Mar 15 @ 3:30 pm – 5:30 pm
There’s the question of what there is, and then there’s the question of what ultimately exists. Many contend that, once we have this distinction clearly in mind, we can see that there is no sensible debate to be had about whether there are such things as properties or tables or numbers, and that the only ontological question worth debating is whether such things are ultimate (in one or another sense). I argue that this is a mistake. Taking debates about ordinary objects as a case study, I show that the arguments that animate these debates bear directly on the question of which objects there are and cannot plausibly be recast as arguments …

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Roger T. Ames 安樂哲 on “Deweyan and Confucian Ethics: A Challenge to the Ideology of Individualism” 4:00 pm
Roger T. Ames 安樂哲 on “Deweyan and Confucian Ethics: A Challenge to the Ideology of Individualism” @ Wolff Conference Room, NSSR, D1103
Mar 15 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
John Dewey, in his resistance to foundational individualism, declares that individual autonomy so conceived is a fiction; for Dewey, it is association that is a fact. In his own language: “There is no sense in asking how individuals come to be associated. They exist and operate in association.” In a way that resonates with Confucian role ethics, the revolutionary Dewey particularizes the fact of associated living and valorizes it by developing a vision of the habitude of unique, defused, relationally-constituted human beings. That is, he develops a distinctive, if not idiosyncratic language of habits and “individuality” to describe the various modalities of association that enable human beings to add value …

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Curved Spacetimes: Where Friedrich Nietzsche Meets Virginia Woolf 6:00 pm
Curved Spacetimes: Where Friedrich Nietzsche Meets Virginia Woolf @ The Tank, 1st flr.
Mar 17 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Professor Barbara Gail Montero is the director of (and a performer in) the upcoming multimedia, interdisciplinary event Curved Spacetimes: Where Friedrich Nietzsche Meets Virginia Woolf. Prof. Nickolas Pappas will also perform (reading spoken word as Friedrich Nietzsche), and Prof. Jonathan Gilmore is a member of the team that brought the project to fruition. According to the American Society for Aesthetics (who partially funded this project with a $7,000 grant), Curved Spacetimes is “multisensory event focused on the Physics, Aesthetics, and Metaphysics of Time. . . .[T]he evening will commence with a Nietzsche-Woolf-curved-spacetime-inspired reception that will allow you to test your knowledge of our central figures. Following the reception, you will experience Nietzsche, Woolf and …

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Romina Padró (CUNY): Inferences First. Logic & Metaphysics Workshop 4:15 pm
Romina Padró (CUNY): Inferences First. Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, 7314
Mar 18 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
Two ways of giving an epistemic justification of basic logical principles will be introduced, intuition-based accounts and concept or meaning constitution-based accounts. We will briefly consider different versions of these views and argue that they face parallel dilemmas. While ‘robust’ accounts are subject to what I call the ‘adoption problem,’ ‘weak’ accounts fail to ground our basic inferential dispositions. Either way, intuitions and meaning-constituting rules turn out to be irrelevant. A more general moral for the epistemology of logic and its priorities will be drawn from the discussion. The Logic and Metaphysics Workshop will be meeting on Mondays from 4:15 to 6:15 in room 7314 of the Graduate Center, CUNY …

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Mind and Language Seminar 4:00 pm
Mind and Language Seminar @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Mar 20 @ 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our topic for Spring 2018 will be Formal Frameworks for Semantics and Pragmatics. We’ll be investigating a range of questions in semantics and/or pragmatics which involve or are relevant to the choice between different kinds of overall structure for theories in these areas. In most sessions, the members of the seminar will receive a week in advance, copies of recent work, or work in progress from a thinker at another university. After reading this work, students discuss it with one of the instructors on the day before the colloquium. Then at the Tuesday colloquium, the instructors give a summary review and raise criticisms or questions about the work. The author …

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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Mar 20 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. Download an interactive PDF version of the schedule here. February 6 • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture Ned Block (New York University) “Perception is Non-Propositional, Non-Conceptual and Iconic” February 13 Francesco Pupa (Nassau Community College) “Determiners are Phrases” February 20 Robert Rupert (University of Colorado, Boulder) “There Is No Personal Level: On the Virtues of a Psychology Flattened from Above” February 27 Reed Winegar (Fordham University) “Kant on Infinity” March 6 • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture David Schweickart (Loyola …

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Cognitive Science Speaker Series 1:00 pm
Cognitive Science Speaker Series @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 7102
Mar 22 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Spring 2019 2/15: Andrew Lee, Philosophy, New York University 2/22: William Robinson, Philosophy, Iowa State University 3/1: Wesley Sauret, Philosophy, University of Bayreuth 3/8: Jean-Paul Noel, Center for Neural Science, New York University 3/15: Santiago Echeverri, Philosophy, New York University 3/22: TBA 3/29: TBA 4/5: No Cognitive Science talk: CUNY Graduate-Student Conference https://2019cunyphilosophyconference.weebly.com/ 4/12: TBA 4/19, 4/26: No talks; Spring Break 5/3: TBA Additional information at: http://bit.ly/cscitalks or e-mail David Rosenthal <davidrosenthal1@gmail.com>
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Kit Fine (NYU): A Theory of the Conditional. Logic & Metaphysics Workshop 4:15 pm
Kit Fine (NYU): A Theory of the Conditional. Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, 7314
Mar 25 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
Abstract: I provide a truth-maker semantics for the conditional and consider the application to imperative and deontic conditionals. The Logic and Metaphysics Workshop will be meeting on Mondays from 4:15 to 6:15 in room 7314 of the Graduate Center, CUNY (365 5th Avenue). The (provisional) schedule is as follows: Feb 4. Melvin Fitting, CUNY Feb 11. Benjamin Neeser, Geneva Feb 18. GC CLOSED. NO MEETING Feb 25. Achille Varzi, Columbia Mar 4. Eric Bayruns Garcia, CUNY Mar 11. Jeremy Goodman, USC Mar 18. Romina Padro, CUNY Mar 25. Kit Fine, NYU Apr 1. Elena Ficara, Paderborn Apr 8. Chris Scambler, NYU Apr 15.  Jenn McDonald, CUNY Apr 22. GC CLOSED. NO …

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Philosophy of Language Workshop 6:30 pm
Philosophy of Language Workshop @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 302
Mar 25 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
We’re a community of philosophers of language centered in New York City. We have a meeting each week at which a speaker presents a piece of their own work relating to the philosophy of language. 28 January Luca Incurvati (ILLC/Amsterdam) 4 February Dan Hoek (NYU) 11 February Peter Klecha (Swarthmore) 25 February Ginger Schultheis (NYU/Chicago) and David Boylan (Rutgers) 4 March Chris Tancredi (Keio University, Tokyo) 11 March TBD 25 March Yael Sharvit (UCLA) 1 April Thony Gillies (Rutgers) 8 April Yale Weiss (CUNY) 15 April Friederike Moltmann (CNRS) 22 April Amir Anvari (Institut Jean Nicod, ENS) 29 April David Balcarras (MIT) 6 May Nadine Theiler (ILLC, Amsterdam) 13 May …

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Epistemology and Ethics Workshop 5:30 pm
Epistemology and Ethics Workshop @ Plaza View Room, 12th Floor
Mar 26 @ 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm
AY 2018 – 19 Workshop Schedule September 25th – Avery Archer (GWU) October 16th – Daniel Singer (Penn) November 13th – Ariel Zylberman (SUNY Albany) February 26th – Vita Emery (Fordham) March 26th – Kathryn Tabb (Columbia) April 23rd – Carol Hay (UMass Lowell) The Epistemology and Ethics group is composed of faculty and graduate students at Fordham and other nearby universities. Papers are read in advance, so the majority of the time is devoted to questions and discussion. Location: Plaza View Room, 12th Floor, Lowenstein Bldg., 113 West 60th Street. If interested in attending, email dheney[at]fordham[dot]edu.
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Mind and Language Seminar 4:00 pm
Mind and Language Seminar @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Mar 27 @ 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our topic for Spring 2018 will be Formal Frameworks for Semantics and Pragmatics. We’ll be investigating a range of questions in semantics and/or pragmatics which involve or are relevant to the choice between different kinds of overall structure for theories in these areas. In most sessions, the members of the seminar will receive a week in advance, copies of recent work, or work in progress from a thinker at another university. After reading this work, students discuss it with one of the instructors on the day before the colloquium. Then at the Tuesday colloquium, the instructors give a summary review and raise criticisms or questions about the work. The author …

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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Mar 27 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. Download an interactive PDF version of the schedule here. February 6 • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture Ned Block (New York University) “Perception is Non-Propositional, Non-Conceptual and Iconic” February 13 Francesco Pupa (Nassau Community College) “Determiners are Phrases” February 20 Robert Rupert (University of Colorado, Boulder) “There Is No Personal Level: On the Virtues of a Psychology Flattened from Above” February 27 Reed Winegar (Fordham University) “Kant on Infinity” March 6 • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture David Schweickart (Loyola …

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Rutgers Philosophy Dept. Colloquia 3:00 pm
Rutgers Philosophy Dept. Colloquia @ Seminar Room, Gateway Transit Building, 5th flr
Mar 28 @ 3:00 pm
The Department’s colloquium series typically meets on Thursdays in the Seminar Room at Gateway Transit Building, 106 Somerset Street, 5th Floor at 3:00 p.m. Please see the Department Calendar for scheduled speakers and more details. 01/31  Department Colloquium-Prof. Brian Epstein (Tufts) 02/07  Inclusive Pedagogy by Prof. Zoë Johnson-King (NYU) 02/28  Climate Lecture-Prof. Teresa Blankmeyer Burke (Gallaudet University) 03/14  Mesthene Lecture-Prof. Lara Buchak (UC Berkeley) 03/28  Break It Down Lecture-Prof. Paul Pietroski, “Human Languages: What are They?” 04/11  Class of 1970s Lecture: Prof. Gideon Rosen (Princeton) Alexander Teleconf. Lecture Hall, 4:30-7:30 pm 04/18  Break It Down Lecture-Prof. Larry Temkin, “Population Ethics: Forty Years On” 04/25 – 04/27 Semantics Workshop (Lepore) 04/27  Rutgers Day …

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Is it wrong for feminists to pay other women for housework? Johanna Oksala, Pratt 6:00 pm
Is it wrong for feminists to pay other women for housework? Johanna Oksala, Pratt @ Wolff Conference Room, NSSR, D1103
Mar 28 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Many philosophers have suggested that the aim of imaginative philosophical inquiry is not to provide right answers, but right questions. This means demonstrating why certain questions are meaningless, based on false assumptions, or become senseless when posed in a wrong context. The question in my title appears to be a good candidate for this type of philosophical inquiry and I will try to show why. However, I will also argue that posing the question is nevertheless important, perhaps not for moral philosophy, but for feminist politics. The argument proceeds in three stages. In the first section, I will discuss Gabrielle Meagher’s article, Jstor, Spring 2002, ‘Is it Wrong to Pay for Housework?’. I …

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Nietzsche and the Disadvantage of History: the Rise of Western Oikophobia. Benedict Beckeld 6:00 pm
Nietzsche and the Disadvantage of History: the Rise of Western Oikophobia. Benedict Beckeld @ Meyer Hall, Room 102, NYU
Mar 28 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
New York University’s Liberal Studies, in Collaboration with Nietzsche Circle, Presents: Nietzsche and the Disadvantage of History: The rise of Western Oikophobia More Info & RSVP: If you like to attend, Please RSVP by sending email to Luke Trusso at luke.trusso@gmail.com
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Celebrating Yirmiyahu Yovel
Celebrating Yirmiyahu Yovel @ Wolff Conference Room, D1103
Mar 29 – Mar 30 all-day
The Philosophy Department of The New School for Social Research invites you to a conference in honor of the life and work of Hans Jonas Professor of Philosophy Yirmiyahu Yovel. The conference will be on March 29th and 30th in the Wolff Conference Room, D1103, 6 E 16th Street. Celebrating Yirmiyahu Yovel Friday, March 29th Chair: Richard J. Bernstein 9 AM – 11 AM: Agnes Heller “The Other Within” 11 AM – 1 PM: Jay Bernstein “Yovel and Hegel’s Phenomenology Lunch 2 PM – 4 PM: James Dodd “The Historical Antinomy” 4PM – 6PM: Jonathan Yovel “Normativity as a Poetic Quality”   Saturday, March 30th Chari: Dmitri Nikulin 9 AM …

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Thinking and Living the Good Life
Thinking and Living the Good Life @ Philosophy Department, Fordham U
Mar 29 – Mar 31 all-day
The theme of our conference, “Thinking and Living the Good Life,” asks participants to think upon what it means to live well in contemporary society, how we can know the right or best way to live, and the role of thought in the enterprise of human life. Evocative of ancient theories of virtue, the theme of the good life also bears on prominent areas of discussion in contemporary political philosophy, epistemology, and metaphysics. Papers topics may include, but are not limited to: the relationship between political structures and the shared goal of realizing a common good; the complexities that arise in trying to achieve knowledge of the good; and the …

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Cognitive Science Speaker Series 1:00 pm
Cognitive Science Speaker Series @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 7102
Mar 29 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Spring 2019 2/15: Andrew Lee, Philosophy, New York University 2/22: William Robinson, Philosophy, Iowa State University 3/1: Wesley Sauret, Philosophy, University of Bayreuth 3/8: Jean-Paul Noel, Center for Neural Science, New York University 3/15: Santiago Echeverri, Philosophy, New York University 3/22: TBA 3/29: TBA 4/5: No Cognitive Science talk: CUNY Graduate-Student Conference https://2019cunyphilosophyconference.weebly.com/ 4/12: TBA 4/19, 4/26: No talks; Spring Break 5/3: TBA Additional information at: http://bit.ly/cscitalks or e-mail David Rosenthal <davidrosenthal1@gmail.com>
Bjorndahl: The Epistemology of Nondeterminism. Logic, Probability, and Games Seminar 4:00 pm
Bjorndahl: The Epistemology of Nondeterminism. Logic, Probability, and Games Seminar @ Faculty House, Columbia U
Mar 29 @ 4:00 pm
Propositional dynamic logic (PDL) is a framework for reasoning about nondeterministic program executions (or, more generally, nondeterministic actions). In this setting, nondeterminism is taken as a primitive: a program is nondeterministic iff it has multiple possible outcomes. But what is the sense of “possibility” at play here? This talk explores an epistemic interpretation: working in an enriched logical setting, we represent nondeterminism as a relationship between a program and an agent deriving from the agent’s (in)ability to adequately measure the dynamics of the program execution. More precisely, using topology to capture the observational powers of an agent, we define the nondeterministic outcomes of a given program execution to be those …

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Confucian Approaches to Intergenerational Ethics. Timothy Connolly (East Stroudsburg) 5:30 pm
Confucian Approaches to Intergenerational Ethics. Timothy Connolly (East Stroudsburg) @ Columbia University Religion Dept. 101
Mar 29 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Since Confucianism is an intergenerational phenomenon, it should have unique insights into ethical issues surrounding our obligations to future generations. In the first part of this discussion, I examine two contemporary Confucian perspectives on intergenerational ethics. Proponents of Confucian Role Ethics have developed an interpretation of xiao 孝 as “intergenerational reverence” that binds the community together over time by reference to shared cultural models and evolving ethical values. The Chinese thinker Jiang Qing in turn argues for a political constitution in which the state depends not just on the will of presently existing citizens, but also serves to preserve and transmit the values of the past for the sake of …

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