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A new genealogy of neoliberalism. History and pertinence of the Lippmann-Dewey debate. Barbara Steigler 12:00 pm
A new genealogy of neoliberalism. History and pertinence of the Lippmann-Dewey debate. Barbara Steigler @ Columbia Maison Française, East Gallery, Buell Hall
Feb 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Where does this sneaking, yet ever more oppressive and widely experienced sense of a generalized lagging behind come from? A feeling which is only strengthened by the perpetual decree that evolution must be preceded by adaptation. In her talk, Barbara Steigler will explore the genealogy of this new imperative which takes us back to the 1930s, to the sources of a new and very powerful political thought—since baptized as “neoliberalism”—which told a great story about[...]
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Castoriadis and the Permutations of the Social Imaginary. Suzi Adams 4:00 pm
Castoriadis and the Permutations of the Social Imaginary. Suzi Adams @ Wolff Conference Room, D1103
Feb 4 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
This paper considers Cornelius Castoriadis’s articulation of social imaginary significations with an emphasis on their link to the radical imaginary. Castoriadis wrote on social imaginary significations for more than thirty years, and his understanding of them changed significantly during this time, yet this is not reflected in debates on his work. The paper argues that there are three distinct phases in his reflections. The first phase can be dated 1964-1970. This early phase is characterized[...]
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Ethics in the Shadow of Love. Quinn White (MIT) 3:30 pm
Ethics in the Shadow of Love. Quinn White (MIT) @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Feb 7 @ 3:30 pm – 5:30 pm
One of the central questions facing human beings is how we should respond to the humanity of others. Since the enlightenment, secular Western ethics has gravitated towards two kinds of answer: we should care for others’ well-being, or we should respect them as autonomous agents. Largely neglected is an answer we can find the religious traditions of Judaism, Christianity and Buddhism: we should love all. Analytic philosophers have started to pay more attention to love.[...]
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Philosophy and Anarchy: Anatomy of a Disavowal. Catherine Malabou 7:00 pm
Philosophy and Anarchy: Anatomy of a Disavowal. Catherine Malabou @ La Maison Française
Feb 10 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
“The issue of anarchy is at once metaphysical and political. Nevertheless, (French) philosophy and politics have always turned their backs on each other when defining it.  One of the fundamental motivations of my lectures is to understand the reason of such a non-dialogue. Different, sometimes contradictory, signs are making manifest the necessity of a new interrogation on anarchy in the current global political situation, far beyond the idea of a violent strategy against the State.[...]
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Social and Political Philosophy Workshop 5:30 pm
Social and Political Philosophy Workshop @ Lowenstein, Plaza View Room (12th Floor)
Feb 11 @ 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm
Meetings are held on Tuesdays at Fordham’s Lincoln Center campus in Manhattan in the Plaza View Room on the 12th floor of the Lowenstein Building (113 W 60th St).We meet from 5:30 to 6:45 and papers are read in advance. If interested in attending, contact sahaddad@fordham.edu, swhitney@fordham.edu, or jeflynn@fordham.edu. ​ 2019-20 September 24 – Rosaura Martínez (UNAM) “Alterability and Writing. Rethinking an Ontology of Dependency” October 15 – Jesús Luzardo (Fordham) “The Wages of the Past: Whiteness, Nostalgia, and[...]
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After the Welfare State: Reconceiving Mutual Aid
After the Welfare State: Reconceiving Mutual Aid @ NYU
Feb 15 – Feb 16 all-day
The 2020 Annual Telos-Paul Piccone Institute Conference Keynote Speaker: Catherine Malabou, Kingston University and University of California, Irvine. Conference Description Although the rise of populism has often been interpreted as the atavistic return of racism and nationalism, the underlying sources have more to do with the collapse of the welfare state model in advanced post-industrial countries, which has resulted in the search for new forms of solidarity that could replace welfare state structures. These structures[...]
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