Calendar

15 Fri
All-day
Black Women Philosophers Conference @ Elebash Recital Hall, CUNY Grad Center
Black Women Philosophers Conference @ Elebash Recital Hall, CUNY Grad Center
Mar 15 all-day
What does a philosopher look like? Inevitably, our mental pictures are shaped by the dominant imagery of the white male marble busts of Greco-Roman antiquity—Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Seneca—and their modern European heirs—Hobbes, Descartes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Mill. Even today Western philosophy is largely male and overwhelmingly white—about 97 percent in the U.S., close to 100 percent in Europe. Diversifying the field requires expanding our corporeal imaginary of its practitioners. This conference, timed to honor Professor Anita Allen-Castellitto (Penn), the first black female President in the 100-year-plus history of the American Philosophical Association, aims to showcase the work of a traditionally under-represented population, challenging these preconceptions. Allen and fifteen other …

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12:00 pm Brown Bag Series @ Philosophy Conference Room, Collins Hall, Room 139
Brown Bag Series @ Philosophy Conference Room, Collins Hall, Room 139
Mar 15 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
A presentation of ongoing research by Fordham Philosophers; bring your own lunch, light refreshments will be provided. All meetings are from 12:00-1:00 pm in the Philosophy Department Conference Room in Collins Hall. Contact: Stephen Grimm Stephen Grimm – September 14, 2018 Andrew Jampol-Petzinger – October 26, 2018 Lauren Kopajtic – November 16, 2018 Nicholas Smyth – February 15, 2019 Brian Johnson – March 15, 2019 Crina Gschwandtner – April 5, 2019
12:00 pm Sue Weinberg Lecture in honor of the life and work of Eileen O’Neill @ CUNY Grad Center, rm tba
Sue Weinberg Lecture in honor of the life and work of Eileen O’Neill @ CUNY Grad Center, rm tba
Mar 15 @ 12:00 pm
Save the date! March 15, 2019 Sue Weinberg Lecture in honor of the life and work of Eileen O’Neill. CUNY Graduate Center, room TBD
1:00 pm Cognitive Science Speaker Series @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 7102
Cognitive Science Speaker Series @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 7102
Mar 15 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Spring 2019 2/15: Andrew Lee, Philosophy, New York University 2/22: William Robinson, Philosophy, Iowa State University 3/1: Wesley Sauret, Philosophy, University of Bayreuth 3/8: Jean-Paul Noel, Center for Neural Science, New York University 3/15: Santiago Echeverri, Philosophy, New York University 3/22: TBA 3/29: TBA 4/5: No Cognitive Science talk: CUNY Graduate-Student Conference https://2019cunyphilosophyconference.weebly.com/ 4/12: TBA 4/19, 4/26: No talks; Spring Break 5/3: TBA Additional information at: http://bit.ly/cscitalks or e-mail David Rosenthal <davidrosenthal1@gmail.com>
3:30 pm “Why Care About What There Is” Daniel Korman (UCSB) @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
“Why Care About What There Is” Daniel Korman (UCSB) @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Mar 15 @ 3:30 pm – 5:30 pm
There’s the question of what there is, and then there’s the question of what ultimately exists. Many contend that, once we have this distinction clearly in mind, we can see that there is no sensible debate to be had about whether there are such things as properties or tables or numbers, and that the only ontological question worth debating is whether such things are ultimate (in one or another sense). I argue that this is a mistake. Taking debates about ordinary objects as a case study, I show that the arguments that animate these debates bear directly on the question of which objects there are and cannot plausibly be recast as arguments …

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4:00 pm Roger T. Ames 安樂哲 on “Deweyan and Confucian Ethics: A Challenge to the Ideology of Individualism” @ Wolff Conference Room, NSSR, D1103
Roger T. Ames 安樂哲 on “Deweyan and Confucian Ethics: A Challenge to the Ideology of Individualism” @ Wolff Conference Room, NSSR, D1103
Mar 15 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
John Dewey, in his resistance to foundational individualism, declares that individual autonomy so conceived is a fiction; for Dewey, it is association that is a fact. In his own language: “There is no sense in asking how individuals come to be associated. They exist and operate in association.” In a way that resonates with Confucian role ethics, the revolutionary Dewey particularizes the fact of associated living and valorizes it by developing a vision of the habitude of unique, defused, relationally-constituted human beings. That is, he develops a distinctive, if not idiosyncratic language of habits and “individuality” to describe the various modalities of association that enable human beings to add value …

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