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4:15 pm Admissibility of Multiple-Conclusion Rules of Logics with the Disjunction Property (Alex Citkin) @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 3309
Admissibility of Multiple-Conclusion Rules of Logics with the Disjunction Property (Alex Citkin) @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 3309
Mar 19 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
I study admissible multiple-conclusion rules of logics having the meta-disjunction expressible by a finite set of formulas. I show that in such logics the bases of admissible single- and multiple-conclusion rules can be converted into each other. Since these conversions are constructive and preserve cardinality, it is possible to obtain a simple way of constructing a base of admissible single-conclusion rules, by a given base of admissible multiple-conclusion rules and vice versa. Because the proofs are purely syntactical, these results can be applied to a broad class of logics. Logic & Metaphysics Workshop Feb 26 Martin Pleitz, Muenster Mar 5 Vera Flocke, NYU Mar 12 Roy Sorensen, WUSTL Mar 19 …

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4:15 pm Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 3309
Logic & Metaphysics Workshop @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 3309
Mar 19 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
Feb 26 Martin Pleitz, Muenster Mar 5 Vera Flocke, NYU Mar 12 Roy Sorensen, WUSTL Mar 19 Alex Citkin, Private Researcher Mar 26 Chris Scambler, NYU Apr 2 SPRING RECESS. NO MEETING Apr 9 Greg Restall, Melbourne Apr 16 Daniel Nolan, Notre Dame Apr 23 Mel Fitting, CUNY Apr 30 Sungil Han, Seoul National May 7 Andreas Ditter, NYU May14 Rohit Parikh
6:00 pm Magical Art: The Power of Images in Hitchcock’s Vertigo @ Cornelia Street Cafe
Magical Art: The Power of Images in Hitchcock’s Vertigo @ Cornelia Street Cafe
Mar 19 @ 6:00 pm
Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo is a brilliant, suspenseful mystery exploring the often dangerous intimacy between love, compulsion, and death.  It is also a profound meditation on the power of art.  While it invites us to go on seeing art as a mimesis – a “representation,” or “imitation” of life – it also cryptically asks whether art objects might do more than merely represent life, even whether they might exercise power over death. James Stewart’s Scotty has been compared to Orpheus in quest of Eurydice; I suggest that he’s worth comparing to Admetus, who wished he could be Orpheus, and who imagines clinging to a statue to recapture his lost wife. The …

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