Calendar

23 Fri
All-day
21st Annual CUNY Graduate Philosophy Conference: Self and Other @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9206
21st Annual CUNY Graduate Philosophy Conference: Self and Other @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9206
Mar 23 all-day
The 21st Annual CUNY Graduate Philosophy Conference will take place on March 23rd, 2018 at the CUNY Graduate Center (365 5th Avenue). This year’s theme is “Self and Other”, broadly construed. The program below features Dr. Akeel Bilgrami (Columbia) and Dr. Daniel Kolak (William Paterson University) as keynote speakers. Eight graduate students from departments across the U.S. and abroad will give 30-minute talks spanning a broad array of philosophical research areas. Click the links to download PDFs of the the conference flyer and schedule of talks. Time / Title / Speaker / Affiliation 8:30-9 AM / BREAKFAST 9-9:30 AM / Embedded Love: What it Means for / Love to Structure Your Will …

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Waiting, Watching, Acting: Immediate and Deferred Responses to Political Crisis @ Columbia University Philosophy Dept. 702
Waiting, Watching, Acting: Immediate and Deferred Responses to Political Crisis @ Columbia University Philosophy Dept. 702
Mar 23 all-day
Waiting, Watching, Acting: Immediate and Deferred Responses to Political Crisis Friday, March 23rd 702 Hamilton Hall Workshop Organizers: Lydia Goehr (Columbia) & Gregg Horowitz (Pratt Institute)
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6:15 pm Scientific Philosophy from Kant to Kuhn and Beyond – Michael Friedman (Stanford) @ NYU Law School, Lipton Hall
Scientific Philosophy from Kant to Kuhn and Beyond – Michael Friedman (Stanford) @ NYU Law School, Lipton Hall
Mar 23 @ 6:15 pm – 8:15 pm
Abstract: These lectures report on my recent work in tracing out a path through a variety of philosophical attempts to appropriate developments in contemporaneous science on behalf of an evolving conception of “scientific” philosophy beginning with Kant and extending to the present.  I concentrate, in particular, on Kant and the post-Kantian tradition.  This includes the Naturphilosophie of Schelling and Hegel, the neo-Kantian reaction to Naturphilosophie initiated by Helmholtz, and the ensuing contributions to nineteenth and early twentieth century philosophy and science by Mach, Poincaré, and Einstein.  I then consider the neo-Kantianism of Ernst Cassirer and (yes) Thomas Kuhn, which finally leads to my own attempt to develop a post-Kuhnian approach to …

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