NYC Area Philosophy Calendar

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
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Deviant Causal Chains and the Law- Sara Bernstein (Notre Dame) 4:10 pm
Deviant Causal Chains and the Law- Sara Bernstein (Notre Dame) @ Philosophy Hall rm 716
Feb 1 @ 4:10 pm – 6:00 pm
Thursday, February 1, 2018 Sara Bernstein (Notre Dame) Title: TBA 4:10 PM – 6:00 PM, Philosophy Hall 716 Reception to follow
Aristotle’s “Nicomachean Ethics” – Week 5/5 7:00 pm
Aristotle’s “Nicomachean Ethics” – Week 5/5
Feb 1 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Brooklyn Philosophy Reading and Discussion Group Thursday, February 1 at 7:00 PM https://www.meetup.com/Brooklyn-Philosophy-Reading-and-Discussion-Group/events/244387842/
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Linda Bosniak, Rutgers University: Affective Citizenship 4:30 pm
Linda Bosniak, Rutgers University: Affective Citizenship @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 5409
Feb 5 @ 4:30 pm
The Center for Global Ethics and Politics Presents: Linda Bosniak, Rutgers University, “Affective Citizenship,” Monday, February 5 @ 4:30 pm, room TBA. Co-sponsored by the Social and Political Theory Student Association
Philosophy of Language Workshop 6:30 pm
Philosophy of Language Workshop @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 302
Feb 5 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
29 January Gillian Russell (UNC) 5 February Mandy Simons (CMU) 12 February (No Workshop) 19 February (No Workshop) 26 February Daniel Rothschild (UCL) 5 March Chris Kennedy (UChicago) 12 March Rachel Sterken (Oslo) 19 March No Workshop (NYU Spring Break) 26 March Andreas Stokke (Uppsala) 2 April Rebekah Baglini (Stanford) 9 April Henry Schiller (UT Austin) 16 April Gary Ostertag (CUNY) 23 April Manuel Križ (Jean Nicod) 30 April Maria Aloni (ILLC/Amsterdam) 7 May Alexis Wellwood (USC)
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Mind and Language Research Seminar 4:00 pm
Mind and Language Research Seminar @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Feb 6 @ 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our topic for Spring 2018 will be Formal Frameworks for Semantics and Pragmatics. We’ll be investigating a range of questions in semantics and/or pragmatics which involve or are relevant to the choice between different kinds of overall structure for theories in these areas. In most sessions, the members of the seminar will receive a week in advance, copies of recent work, or work in progress from a thinker at another university. After reading this work, students discuss it with one of the instructors on the day before the colloquium. Then at the Tuesday colloquium, the instructors give a summary review and raise criticisms or questions about the work. The author …

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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Feb 7 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. February 7th • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture David Papineau (CUNY Graduate Center | King’s College London) “Kinds and Essences: Taming Metaphysical Modality” February 14th Jane Friedman (NYU) “The Epistemic and the Zetetic” February 21st Muhammad Ali Khalidi (York U) “Are Sexes Natural Kinds?” February 28th Laurie Paul (UNC) “De Se Truth and Epistemic Revolution” March 7th • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture Steven Lukes (NYU) Title TBD March 14th Collin O’Neill (CUNY Lehman College) “Consent and Third-Party Coercion in Medicine and Research” March 21st Edouard Machery (Pittsburgh) TBD …

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How the Brain Decides, Thinks and Creates – Brain Insight Lecture 6:30 pm
How the Brain Decides, Thinks and Creates – Brain Insight Lecture @ Columbia U Faculty House Presidential Ballroom 3rd Floor
Feb 7 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
The brain is often compared to a computer. But the two are not as similar as one would think. Computers process information whereas the brain interrogates and explores. It seeks information from the environment with a purpose—to answer a question, solve a problem or make a decision. Neuroscience has made great advances in our understanding of how the brain makes decisions, why some are speedy and some are slower and more deliberative. Decisions matter for all animals. For humans, they hold the key to thought, ideation and creative expression. What was once the purview of psychology and philosophy is now a staple of biomedical science. And by elucidating the underlying …

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Explanation, Distance & Dependence – Elanor Taylor (Johns Hopkins) 4:00 pm
Explanation, Distance & Dependence – Elanor Taylor (Johns Hopkins) @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 5307
Feb 8 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
One way for an attempt at explanation to fail is for the explanans (which does the explaining) to be too close to the explanandum (the thing explained). In this paper I discuss this feature, which I call explanatory distance. I consider some different approaches to explanatory distance, and propose an account of explanatory distance articulated in terms of dependence. I then discuss the implications of this View for some recent applications of grounding. Schedule for Spring 2018 Here is a sneak peak at our exciting line-up of speakers and events for Spring 2018. Some times and rooms TBA. Elanor Taylor, February 8, CUNY Graduate Center, The Committee for Interdisciplinary Science Studies, Room …

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Working Papers in Ethics and Moral Psychology 5:30 pm
Working Papers in Ethics and Moral Psychology @ Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Anneberg 12-15
Feb 8 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Working Papers in Ethics and Moral Psychology is a speaker series conducted under the auspices of the Icahn School of Medicine Bioethics Program. It is a working group where speakers are invited to present well-developed, as yet unpublished work. The focus of the group is interdisciplinary, with an emphasis on topics in ethics, bioethics, neuroethics, and moral psychology. The meetings begin with a brief presentation by the invited speaker and the remaining time is devoted to a discussion of the paper. The speakers will make their papers available in advance of their presentation to those who sign up for the Working Papers mailing list. All speakers: 9/28/2017: Eric Chwang /Rutgers …

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Cognitive Science Speaker Series 1:00 pm
Cognitive Science Speaker Series @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 7-102
Feb 9 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
February 9: Jessie Munton Philosophy, New York University “How Long Is ‘a’ Visual Experience?” March 9: Taylor Webb Neuroscience Institute and Cognitive Science, Princeton University Title TBA April 13: Eleni Manolakaki Philosophy and History of Science, University of Athens “Propositions as Measures of Mind” For spring 2018, the CUNY Cognitive Science Speaker Series will meet once a month. We’ll return to weekly talks in fall 2018. All talks are at the CUNY Graduate Center, 365 Fifth Avenue, room 7-102, Fridays, 1-3 pm. http://bit.ly/cs-talks
Beyond Time, Not Before Time: Affirming the Beginningless Reality of Conceptual Differentiation in Indian Philosophy- Catherine Prueitt (George Mason) 5:30 pm
Beyond Time, Not Before Time: Affirming the Beginningless Reality of Conceptual Differentiation in Indian Philosophy- Catherine Prueitt (George Mason) @ Columbia Religion Dept. rm 101
Feb 9 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
The Pratyabhijñā Śaiva tradition, as first systematized by Utpaladeva (10th century) and elaborated by Abhinavagupta (10th-11th century), follows a number of other classical Indian philosophical traditions in 1) fully acknowledging that Buddhist Vijñānavādins claim to account for the diversity manifest in the conventional world through an appeal to beginningless karmic imprints; and 2) utterly rejecting that this solution avoids circularity. To sum up the Śaiva critique: a Vijñānavādin cannot avoid the question of what causes the diversity of experiences in the conventional world by appealing to beginningless causal processes because these processes themselves require the existence of some kind of real stuff that has the capacity to manifest in diverse …

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Mind and Language Research Seminar 4:00 pm
Mind and Language Research Seminar @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Feb 13 @ 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our topic for Spring 2018 will be Formal Frameworks for Semantics and Pragmatics. We’ll be investigating a range of questions in semantics and/or pragmatics which involve or are relevant to the choice between different kinds of overall structure for theories in these areas. In most sessions, the members of the seminar will receive a week in advance, copies of recent work, or work in progress from a thinker at another university. After reading this work, students discuss it with one of the instructors on the day before the colloquium. Then at the Tuesday colloquium, the instructors give a summary review and raise criticisms or questions about the work. The author …

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“In Defense of Uncivil Disobedience” 5:30 pm
“In Defense of Uncivil Disobedience” @ Plaza View Room, 12th Flr, Lowenstein
Feb 13 @ 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm
Candice Delmas (Northeastern) presented by the Fordham Workshop in Social and Political Philosophy March 13 – Robert Gooding-Williams (Columbia) April 17 – Serene Khader (Brooklyn College/CUNY Grad Center) Meetings are held on Tuesdays at Fordham’s Lincoln Center campus in Manhattan in the Plaza View Room, 12th Floor, Lowenstein Building (113 W. 60th St). We meet from 5:30 to 6:45 and papers are read in advance. If interested in attending, contact sahaddad@fordham.edu or jeflynn@fordham.edu. ​
Time in Mayan Philosophy – Alexus McLeod 7:30 pm
Time in Mayan Philosophy – Alexus McLeod @ Brooklyn Public Library, Dweck Center
Feb 13 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Beyond the Linear-Cyclical Distinction: The Nature of Maya Philosophy of Time Since the early 20th century, anthropologists have distinguished two ways cultures can think about time. On the linear conception of time, everything happens only once, never to be repeated. On the cyclic conception of time, the world is made of a recurring cycle of events. This distinction has come to be a mainstay of categorizing Maya conceptions of time, even in much contemporary scholarship.  I argue that the linear-cyclical distinction is problematic for understanding ancient Maya conceptions of time, that it is a problematic distinction in general, and that a better way of understanding the ancient Maya conception of …

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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Feb 14 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. February 7th • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture David Papineau (CUNY Graduate Center | King’s College London) “Kinds and Essences: Taming Metaphysical Modality” February 14th Jane Friedman (NYU) “The Epistemic and the Zetetic” February 21st Muhammad Ali Khalidi (York U) “Are Sexes Natural Kinds?” February 28th Laurie Paul (UNC) “De Se Truth and Epistemic Revolution” March 7th • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture Steven Lukes (NYU) Title TBD March 14th Collin O’Neill (CUNY Lehman College) “Consent and Third-Party Coercion in Medicine and Research” March 21st Edouard Machery (Pittsburgh) TBD …

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CUNY-Milan Annual Interdisciplinary Workshop on Belief
CUNY-Milan Annual Interdisciplinary Workshop on Belief @ CUNY Grad Center, Philosophy Dept.
Feb 15 – Feb 16 all-day
CUNY-Milan Annual Interdisciplinary Workshop in Philosophy, a joint initiative of both institutions’ philosophy departments, is aimed at promoting advanced studies in core analytic topics. This year’s workshop, first in a series of annual events, will focus on belief. Albeit this workshop’s main objective is to advance research in Philosophy of Mind and Logic, the organizers are committed to maintain the interdisciplinary character of the workshop. This year’s inaugural conference will focus on belief. It is the aim of the organizers to provide an interdisciplinary perspective on the topic of belief. Some of the topics to be discussed include: Mental states/attitudes and beliefs; the connection between imagination and belief; group beliefs; …

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A Lawyer, A Poet, and A Philosopher Walk into a Bar to talk about LOVE 8:00 pm
A Lawyer, A Poet, and A Philosopher Walk into a Bar to talk about LOVE @ Las Tapas Bar and Restaurant
Feb 15 @ 8:00 pm
Love is patient, it is kind, it is cruel, it is blind, it hurts, it heals, it is a sickness, it is the drug, it is like oxygen, it is all you need, it stinks, it is supreme, it is eternal, it fades, it is the answer, it is life. Join us for a symposium on that which makes us human. Thursday, February 15, 2018 at 8p.m. At Las Tapas Bar and Restaurant, 808 W 187th Street, New York, NY 10033. (Take the A Train) Admission is $15, which includes one complimentary tapa and drink.  Reservations are recommended (646.590.0142) Leo Glickman is a partner in Stoll, Glickman & Bellina, LLP. …

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Robert Long (NYU) 1:00 pm
Robert Long (NYU) @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 7-102
Feb 16 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
PoPRocks (formerly known as ‘WoPoP’) is an ongoing series in the NYC area for early career researchers – typically grad students and postdocs – working on philosophy of psychology/mind/perception/cognitive science/neuroscience/… . We usually meet roughly once every 2 weeks to informally discuss a draft paper by one of our members, but Spring 2018 we will be meeting less frequently. Typically presenters send a copy of their paper around 1 week in advance, so do join the mailing list (by emailing poprocksworkshop@gmail.com or one of the organizers) or email to ask for a copy of the paper. We aim for a friendly, constructive discussion with the understanding that the drafts discussed …

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Jay Wallace (UC Berkeley) 3:30 pm
Jay Wallace (UC Berkeley) @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Feb 16 @ 3:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Talk title and abstract forthcoming. Reception to follow in 6th floor lounge.
Schervish: Finitely-Additive Decision Theory 4:10 pm
Schervish: Finitely-Additive Decision Theory @ Faculty House, Columbia U
Feb 16 @ 4:10 pm
We examine general decision problems with loss functions that are bounded below. We allow the loss function to assume the value ∞. No other assumptions are made about the action space, the types of data available, the types of non-randomized decision rules allowed, or the parameter space. By allowing prior distributions and the randomizations in randomized rules to be finitely-additive, we find very general complete class and minimax theorems. Specifically, under the sole assumption that the loss function is bounded below, every decision problem has a minimal complete class and all admissible rules are Bayes rules. Also, every decision problem has a minimax rule and a least-favorable distribution and every …

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Mind and Language Research Seminar 4:00 pm
Mind and Language Research Seminar @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Feb 20 @ 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our topic for Spring 2018 will be Formal Frameworks for Semantics and Pragmatics. We’ll be investigating a range of questions in semantics and/or pragmatics which involve or are relevant to the choice between different kinds of overall structure for theories in these areas. In most sessions, the members of the seminar will receive a week in advance, copies of recent work, or work in progress from a thinker at another university. After reading this work, students discuss it with one of the instructors on the day before the colloquium. Then at the Tuesday colloquium, the instructors give a summary review and raise criticisms or questions about the work. The author …

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Minorities and Philosophy Spring Workshop Series 7:00 pm
Minorities and Philosophy Spring Workshop Series @ Various Locations around NYC
Feb 20 @ 7:00 pm – 9:30 pm
The Minorities and Philosophy (MAP) Chapters of Columbia, The New School, Rutgers, CUNY, NYU, and Princeton invite submissions from graduate students and postdoctoral fellows from underrepresented groups for a workshop series (NY-MAPWorks) in spring 2018. Dates: Jan 30th (NYU), Feb. 20th (New School), March 6th (CUNY), April 17th (Columbia), May 8th (NYU), 7-9:30pm. Submission Guidelines: To apply, please compete the following by December 15th, 2017: Send an extended abstract of 750-1,000 words (.pdf or .doc), prepared for blind review, suitable for a 25-30 minute presentation to a general philosophical audience to nymapshop@gmail.com. Provide your contact information by completing this google form. Applications will only be accepted from individuals from groups …

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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Feb 21 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. February 7th • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture David Papineau (CUNY Graduate Center | King’s College London) “Kinds and Essences: Taming Metaphysical Modality” February 14th Jane Friedman (NYU) “The Epistemic and the Zetetic” February 21st Muhammad Ali Khalidi (York U) “Are Sexes Natural Kinds?” February 28th Laurie Paul (UNC) “De Se Truth and Epistemic Revolution” March 7th • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture Steven Lukes (NYU) Title TBD March 14th Collin O’Neill (CUNY Lehman College) “Consent and Third-Party Coercion in Medicine and Research” March 21st Edouard Machery (Pittsburgh) TBD …

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A Dynamic Solution to the Liar Paradox – Martin Pleitz (Muenster) 4:15 pm
A Dynamic Solution to the Liar Paradox – Martin Pleitz (Muenster) @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 3309
Feb 26 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm
The Liar paradox arises when we combine the assumption that a sentence can refer to itself with our naïve notion of truth and apply our unrevised logic. Most current approaches to the Liar paradox focus on revising our notion of truth and logic because nowadays almost everyone is convinced that there are self-referential sentences. I will argue against this conviction. My argument starts from observations about the metaphysics of expressions: A meaningful expression is based in a syntactic expression which in turn is based in a non-semiotic object, and these are pairwise distinct. As all objects of this three-fold ontology exist only relative to contexts, we can import ideas from …

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Philosophy of Language Workshop 6:30 pm
Philosophy of Language Workshop @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 302
Feb 26 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
29 January Gillian Russell (UNC) 5 February Mandy Simons (CMU) 12 February (No Workshop) 19 February (No Workshop) 26 February Daniel Rothschild (UCL) 5 March Chris Kennedy (UChicago) 12 March Rachel Sterken (Oslo) 19 March No Workshop (NYU Spring Break) 26 March Andreas Stokke (Uppsala) 2 April Rebekah Baglini (Stanford) 9 April Henry Schiller (UT Austin) 16 April Gary Ostertag (CUNY) 23 April Manuel Križ (Jean Nicod) 30 April Maria Aloni (ILLC/Amsterdam) 7 May Alexis Wellwood (USC)
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Goldman Lecture 4:00 pm
Goldman Lecture @ Rutgers Philosophy Dept. 5th floor Seminar Rm.
Feb 27 @ 4:00 pm
The Department’s colloquium series typically meets on Thursdays in the Seminar Room at Gateway Bldg, 106 Somerset Street, 5th Floor. 2/27/18 Goldman Lecture, 4pm 3/1/18 Mesthene Lecture, Prof. Miranda Fricker (GC-CUNY), 3:00-6:30 pm 3/22/18 RU Climate Lecture, Prof. Sally Haslanger (MIT) 3:00-5:00 pm 4/8/18 Karen Bennett (Cornell University) 4/12/18 Sanders Lecture, Prof. Linda Zagzebski (University of Oklahoma) 4/13/18 Rutgers Chinese Philosophy Conference, 9:30 am-6:30 pm 4/13-4/14/18 Marilyn McCord Adams Memorial Conference 4/14-4/15/18 Rutgers-Columbia Undergraduate Philosophy Conference (held at Columbia University) 4/17/18 Class of 1970’s Lecture, Prof. Jeremy Waldron (NYU), Alexander Teleconference Lecture Hall, 4:30-7:30 pm 5/21-5/25/18 Metaphysical Mayhem 6/8-6/9/18 Pantheism Workshop 7/8-7/15/18 Summer Institute for Diversity in Philosophy (held at …

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Mind and Language Research Seminar 4:00 pm
Mind and Language Research Seminar @ NYU Philosophy Dept. rm 202
Feb 27 @ 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our topic for Spring 2018 will be Formal Frameworks for Semantics and Pragmatics. We’ll be investigating a range of questions in semantics and/or pragmatics which involve or are relevant to the choice between different kinds of overall structure for theories in these areas. In most sessions, the members of the seminar will receive a week in advance, copies of recent work, or work in progress from a thinker at another university. After reading this work, students discuss it with one of the instructors on the day before the colloquium. Then at the Tuesday colloquium, the instructors give a summary review and raise criticisms or questions about the work. The author …

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Epistemology and Ethics Workshop 5:30 pm
Epistemology and Ethics Workshop @ Plaza View Room, 12th Flr, Lowenstein
Feb 27 @ 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm
The Epistemology and Ethics group is composed of faculty and graduate students at Fordham and other nearby universities. Papers are read in advance, so the majority of the time is devoted to questions and discussion. If interested in attending, email dheney[at]fordham[dot]edu. September 19th  Kate Manne (Cornell) October 17th  Sandy Goldberg (Northwestern) November 14th  Eden Lin (Ohio State) February 27th  Nathan Ballantyne (Fordham) March 20th  Sophie Horowitz (UMass, Amherst) April 24th  Nomy Arpaly (Brown)
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CUNY Colloquium 4:15 pm
CUNY Colloquium @ CUNY Grad Center, rm 9204/5
Feb 28 @ 4:15 pm
Each colloquium is held on Wednesday at 4:15 P.M. All colloquia will take place at the Graduate Center in rooms 9204/9205 except as otherwise noted. Please call (212) 817-8615 for further information. February 7th • Jerrold Katz Memorial Lecture David Papineau (CUNY Graduate Center | King’s College London) “Kinds and Essences: Taming Metaphysical Modality” February 14th Jane Friedman (NYU) “The Epistemic and the Zetetic” February 21st Muhammad Ali Khalidi (York U) “Are Sexes Natural Kinds?” February 28th Laurie Paul (UNC) “De Se Truth and Epistemic Revolution” March 7th • Marx Wartofsky Memorial Lecture Steven Lukes (NYU) Title TBD March 14th Collin O’Neill (CUNY Lehman College) “Consent and Third-Party Coercion in Medicine and Research” March 21st Edouard Machery (Pittsburgh) TBD …

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A listing of the (usually) free philosophy events, lectures and conferences in the New York City area. Support the calendar by leaving a tip, buying a t-shirt/ coffee mug/ sticker design as seen on the sidebar to the right, or buying me a beer if you are in NYC.

Need philosophical advice? Ask Here!
(new podcast series by BKPP)

There are more talks, especially on specific topics, some of which I choose not to add and others that I’ve just missed.  See the links to philosophy groups and departments below.

N.B. Most information has been taken from webpages and is provided as is, with no guarantees as to its accuracy or the quality of the philosophy.

I take no credit for this great idea. See the Boston Area Philosophy Calendar and mailing list. If you have a correction, addition or question, or want to buy me beer, please send me an email at noah /at/ noahgreenstein \dot\ com. Tweet at the calendar @nycaphical.


Specific Philosophy related Groups [department links below]

New York Logic – provides a calendar of logic, mathematical logic and related talks and events.

Epistemology and Ethics Workshops at Fordham

The New York Philosophy of Language Workshop at NYU 

Metro Area Philosophy of Science (MAPS) [formerly: NY/NJ Philosophy of Science Group] https://www.facebook.com/groups/metroareaphilscience/

Formal Philosophy/ Logic Group @ Columbia

Cognitive Science Symposium @CUNY

Linguistics Colloquium @ CUNY

The Foucault Society

New York Society for Ethical Culture

Society for Women in Philosophy – Analytic Workshop Series

SWIPshop workshop for philosophy of gender, sex, and sexuality, feminist philosophy, feminist theory, feminism, and related topics.

Maison Française: Columbia, NYU

Deutsches Haus, NYU

Nietzsche Circle

The Social & Political Philosophy Working Group

Lacan Dot Com

Center for Law and Philosophy

New York German Idealism Workshop

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy

Society for the Metaphysics of Science

Gotham Philosophical Society

Union Theological Seminary

NYU Center for Mind, Brain and Consciousness

NYU Center for Bioethics

Kripke Center at CUNY

NYU New York Institute of Philosophy

Fordham Workshop in Social and Political Philosophy

Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought

The Center for Science & Society, Columbia U

New York Circle

Brooklyn Public Philosophers

Mind and Language Seminar @ NYU


Philosophy Meetups

http://philosophy.meetup.com/cities/us/ny/new_york/

I have never attended a meetup, but it looks like a good time.


Philosophy Department Sites

http://philosophy.fas.nyu.edu/page/events NYU events

http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Page-Elements/Academics-Research-Centers-Initiatives/Doctoral-Programs/Philosophy/Program-Events/Colloquium/ CUNY Events

http://philosophy.columbia.edu/events/colloquium-series Columbia Events

http://www.fordham.edu/info/20946/department_life Fordham Events (http://www.fordhamphilosophy.org/events/)

http://www.newschool.edu/nssr/philosophy/ New School for Social Research Events [See the linked pdf where it says, “View this semester’s departmental lecture series.”]

http://philosophy.rutgers.edu/events-335/department-calendar/year.listevents/ Rutgers Philosophy Dept. Events (old colloquia page)

http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/philosophy/events.html, http://www.stonybrook.edu/sb/nyc/ (Stony Brook Manhattan)

http://www.slc.edu/news-events/events/index.html Sarah Lawrence College Events


If all else fails, try The Practical Ontologist, Thought Gallery or go to the beach.