Sep
23
Mon
Climate Change and Reflexive Law: The EU Sustainable Finance Action Plan. Boudewijn de Bruin (U Groningen) @ ZOOM
Sep 23 @ 12:00 pm – 12:30 pm

Zoom link

This talk examines the instruments suggested by the key policy document driving sustainable finance in the European Union, the Action Plan on Financing Sustainable Growth. It uses a reflexive law approach coupled with insights from epistemology. The chapter first discusses the Action Plan and the concept of reflexive law (which focuses on such epistemic instruments as disclosure, reporting, and labelling). It discusses a number of challenges the plan faces (about, e.g., investor ignorance, long-termism, scenario analysis, accounting standards). It then introduces an alternative to reflexive law (called “epistemic law”), and argues that disclosure, reporting, and labelling improve by taking into account insights from epistemology and social science concerning the form and content of information. The talk’s recommendation is, in a slogan, to provide different information, and to provide information differently.

Interviewer: Lisa Warenski (CUNY Graduate Center and University of Connecticut)

We are pleased to announce the launch of a new and thought-provoking interview series: “In Conversation: Exploring the Philosophy of Money and Finance”. The series kicks off with a selection of esteemed contributors to the recently published book, The Philosophy of Money and Finance (OUP, 2024).

Each interview will be followed by a live debate, encouraging active audience participation. The sessions (interview plus debate) will be 30 minutes long.

chair: Emiliano Ippoliti (Sapienza University of Rome)

organization: Emiliano Ippoliti (Sapienza University of Rome); Joakim Sandberg (University of Gothenburg); Lisa Warenski (CUNY Graduate Center and University of Connecticut)

info: phinancenet@gmail.com; lwarenski@gc.cuny.edu ; emiliano.ippoliti@uniroma1.it

Oct
7
Mon
Resisting the Divides: Contemporary Philosophy of Art @ Brooklyn College Library
Oct 7 – Oct 8 all-day

The philosophy of art, as practiced in the western world, has tended to have two divided homes: in analytic philosophy and continental philosophy. Within the analytic tradition, the philosophy of art has recently undergone a revival with the emphasis on perception. This has more closely aligned art theory to science and questions of biology as well as to issues within psychology. The continental tradition has traditionally drawn upon phenomenology’s first-person experience with its ties to embodied perception as well as the social and historical concerns of the social aspect of art. In the realm itself of visual art, the state of (so-called) post-post modernism has resulted in both the dissolution of belief in progress and even, according to some art critics, a lamentable stagnation. But many philosophers of the last century, beginning with Walter Benjamin, Adorno, Nelson Goodman, etc., have suggested that art needs to be thought of within its social, pragmatic, or epistemological functions, suggesting perhaps a need to think of art outside the confines of modernism’s stylistic revolutions and formalist issues. Relatedly, the pluralism within science could be accessed as model for this enterprise. Multiple views on a phenomenon are required due to the complexity of the enterprise, and the practice of both making art and of perceiving it might be in that category. This conference seeks to bring these strands, the analytical and the continental ones, together and evaluate how to move forward with art theory in an age of globalization.

We welcome submissions on these possible questions:

1.     Should we value a diversity of perspectives in art theory? If so, what is the value? If not, why not?

2.     Are there aspects of art that we presume to be universal that are, in fact, culturally situated?

3.     How should different ways of experiencing art be characterized?

4.     What is the epistemological function of art?

5.     How does the monetary role in art affect both the artist and the perceiver of art?

6.     How do the mechanics of seeing (e.g., gist perception, peripheral vision, etc.) affect how we experience art?

7.     How does the practice of making art relate to the first-person experience?

8.     What role does Husserl’s “bracketing” have in the viewing or making of art?

9.     Are there specific non-western traditions that provide a better explanatory solution for the role of art than have the competing paradigms of continental and analytic?

We welcome your participation and look forward to your contributions. Papers should not extend over 45 minutes. Q & A are 15 minutes.

To submit anonymized abstract BY JULY 15, 2024: papers: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe5c9bmoBYb3hCAb0YWWfzV0BLWbhig2PD5VeKU358VA3RKGw/viewform?usp=sf_link

Oct
8
Tue
Credit and Distributive Justice. Marco Meyer (U Hamburg) @ ZOOM
Oct 8 @ 12:00 pm – 12:30 pm

Zoom link

The author argues that the credit system may improve distributive justice, but only indirectly, via job creation and government spending. The reason for this is that cheap credit on commercial terms is only available to people in the upper half of the wealth distribution. By contrast, the forms of credit available more widely are too expensive to make taking out credit a realistic option to escape poverty for most. However, credit can improve distributive justice indirectly, if entrepreneurs and corporations borrow for purposes that create jobs, or states spend borrowed funds on programs that address poverty or inequality. For these reasons, the author suggests that improving access to credit is less important from the perspective of distributive justice than how the credit system interacts with the tax system and labor laws.

Interviewer: Lisa Warenski (CUNY Graduate Center and University of Connecticut)

We are pleased to announce the launch of a new and thought-provoking interview series: “In Conversation: Exploring the Philosophy of Money and Finance”. The series kicks off with a selection of esteemed contributors to the recently published book, The Philosophy of Money and Finance (OUP, 2024).

Each interview will be followed by a live debate, encouraging active audience participation. The sessions (interview plus debate) will be 30 minutes long.

chair: Emiliano Ippoliti (Sapienza University of Rome)

organization: Emiliano Ippoliti (Sapienza University of Rome); Joakim Sandberg (University of Gothenburg); Lisa Warenski (CUNY Graduate Center and University of Connecticut)

info: phinancenet@gmail.com; lwarenski@gc.cuny.edu ; emiliano.ippoliti@uniroma1.it

Nov
8
Fri
A Conference in Honor of Pat Kitcher @ Philosophy Dep. Columbia U
Nov 8 – Nov 9 all-day
Conference in honor of renowned Kant scholar Patricia Kitcher, Roberta and William Campbell Professor Emerita of the Humanities at Columbia University.
University of Notre Dame
Princeton University
University of California, Berkeley
Brown University
Columbia University
Columbia University
Johns Hopkins University
New York University
Columbia University
Humboldt-University, Berlin
Universität Leipzig
(unaffiliated)

Details

Please RSVP to either Sabina Bremner (sbremner@upenn.edu) or Francey Russell (frussell@barnard.edu)

Mar
21
Fri
The 2025 Telos Conference: China Keywords / 中国关键词 @ Telos-Paul Piccone Institute
Mar 21 – Mar 22 all-day

The 2025 annual conference of the Telos-Paul Piccone Institute will culminate the first year of a five-year program—the Telos China Initiative—that has aimed to set Telos on a distinct intellectual course.

The Telos circle falls outside many conventional intellectual categories. During the Cold War, this quality enabled us to form a bridge between Eastern Europe and the Anglosphere. We fostered work by Soviet-bloc intellectuals, helping Western readers understand the ideological dynamics at play behind the Iron Curtain; we supported a wide variety of dissidents in their opposition to bureaucratic centralization, as we have likewise for opponents of bureaucratic governance in the West; and we brokered an encounter between Marxism and phenomenology that was vital for critical thinkers in the Soviet and the liberal democratic world.

We believe that the future of the TPPI now lies in a parallel reciprocal engagement with China, to which we have given steadily increasing focus for the past ten years in our annual conferences. These meetings have laid the basis for seven special issues of the journal Telos, as well as numerous individual articles in the field. With the Telos China Initiative, we seek to become a key bridge for a mutually regarding, critical discussion of social and political theory between China and the West, well beyond the circles of East Asia specialists.

Keywords

Our 2025 conference will cap the first year of this initiative, during which we launched our webinar series “China Keywords.” Taking broad inspiration from Raymond Williams’s Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society (1976), each webinar critically explores a single concept essential for understanding contemporary Chinese social and political theory, illuminating these concepts with an eye toward non-specialists in the West, while also addressing deep contestations of interest to experts in the field. Our conference takes the name of this webinar series and seeks to build on its themes. We expect the conference to result in a special issue of Telos.

We seek proposals for individual papers and full panels focused on, or that take as their starting point, a single keyword important for critically understanding the political-theoretical dynamics of contemporary China, which include its ideologies of global order and Chinese mission. These keywords may change meaning based on where one is standing—and they are, therefore, key points of contention. Some examples include:

  • tianxia (天下)
  • wangdao (王道)
  • Wealth and power (富强)
  • The party-state
  • Socialism with Chinese characteristics (中国特色社会主义)
  • Cultural Self-Confidence (文化自信)
  • New Confucianism (新儒家)
  • Mr. Democracy (德先生)
  • Reform and Opening-Up (改革开放)
  • River Elegy (河殤)
  • Sinocentrism (中国中心主义)
  • Neo-imperialism (新帝國主義)
  • The China Model (中国模式)
  • Community of Common Destiny (人类命运共同体)
  • The New Era (新时代)

We are also open to considering papers that examine keywords or concepts from the West as they may apply to China and its place in the world, such as: authoritarianism, New Cold War, liberal world order, Leninism, and illiberal globalization.

Papers or panels that illuminate the possibilities for critical theoretical dialogue between China and the West are most welcome, as are those from specialists that focus on intellectual debates within China. Likewise, contributions are welcome from specialists in Western theoretical traditions who seek to make a bridge to Chinese discursive communities—for instance, through the work of Carl Schmitt or the tradition of Critical Theory, with which the Telos circle has long been interested—as are papers that, fitting with the traditions of our circle, oppose any authority, East or West, that limits the possibility of individual emancipation within the telos of politics and of humankind.

Submissions Guidelines

Presentations at the conference should be no more than 15 minutes long, between 1500–2000 words. Our conference has a two-stage process for acceptance: first, submission of a presentation proposal and, second, submission of a presentation draft. Both stages must be completed for final acceptance to the conference.

Presentation proposals should describe the topic of a talk or of a full panel in 100–250 words. They should be made by September 1, 2024. Proposals for full panels, which can include up to four presenters, should include proposals for all presentations as well as for the panel as a whole.

With each proposal, please include the name and institutional affiliation of each presenter, as well as a curriculum vita or resume. In addition to established university faculty, independent scholars, students, and individuals working fully outside university circles are warmly invited to submit proposals.

Review of proposals will be conducted on a rolling basis until the September 1 deadline, with final notification by September 15. Successful proposals will be invited to submit a presentation draft.

Presentation drafts are due by November 15, 2024. A presentation draft need be only 1000 words long and need not be polished, though submission of full presentations is strongly encouraged. Final notification of acceptance will take place by December 1. Feedback on drafts will be provided by the organizers to ensure an excellent conference event based with a fruitful exchange of competing and complementary ideas.

Please note that TPPI is not able to provide travel or accommodation funds, that there will be no option to present via Zoom, and that there will be a conference registration fee. Past registration fees for non-student members of TPPI have been about $300. These fees provide not only for conference attendance but also for a celebratory conference dinner, lunches, and refreshments.

Submit proposals or inquiries to chinaconference2025@telosinstitute.net.